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Hi all, My server is currently running RHEL 5. I would like to install RHEL 6 over it. Do I simply install it and will the installation erase everything I ...
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  1. #1
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    Installing RHEL 6 over RHEL 5


    Hi all,

    My server is currently running RHEL 5. I would like to install RHEL 6 over it. Do I simply install it and will the installation erase everything I have on the server now?

    Thank you.

    Regards,
    Rayne

  2. #2
    Linux Guru Rubberman's Avatar
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    Updating one version to another minor update of the same, such as 5.6 to 5.7, or 6.0 to 6.1, is not hard - the standard install DVD images allow this. To update from one major version to another REALLY requires a full reinstall. IE, it will take time, you need to backup all your data and configuration files, and reinstall EVERYTHING. I moved from CentOS (RHEL) 5.5 to 6.0 on my workstation/server, and that's what I had to do. You CAN try to do the update in-situ, but make sure you do a full bit-image backup of your system drive before you do, because you will probably have to restore it to the previous state at least once...
    Sometimes, real fast is almost as good as real time.
    Just remember, Semper Gumbi - always be flexible!

  3. #3
    Linux Newbie SL6-A1000's Avatar
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    I reckon to make life easier for yourself, you should if you have free space or another free hard disk
    a) Copy the current OS into the available free space (providing it is large enough). Then install RHEL 6 over the original RHEL 5.
    b) Back-up all your data and just install RHEL 6 over 5.
    c) If you have a blank hard disk, just install the new version of RHEL 6 straight onto that hardisk, if its a desktop change the boot order (or even the sata port) to 1 and then add to your grub config in RHEL 6
    -------------------
    RHEL 5 Grub Menu
    rootnoverify (hdx,x) (depending on what sata port it is & partition your root is on)
    chainloader +1
    ---------------------
    Note: i suggest adding RHEL 5 to RHEL 6's Grub menu, because i'm assuming you will eventually delete RHEL 5. Thus if you add RHEL 6 to RHEL 5's Grub menu, you may be left with an unbootable OS (depending on how you configure it) once 5 is removed.

    This would allow you to access everything in RHEL 5 (so your not down and unable to work) while also being able to setup RHEL 6.
    The benefit is once 6 is set to your liking and you have everything you want of 5, you can remove 5 and gain free space if needed.

    I would recommend C, while it seems like more work its actually the same amount with more benefits; one being you won't have a period of an inoperable computer, thus installing RHEL 6 can be done at convientent times and not a rushed job. Others include a known secure back-up and if you stuff RHEL 6 up, again you won't be left without a computer.
    Last edited by SL6-A1000; 12-21-2011 at 03:50 AM.

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  5. #4
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    Thanks all!

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    Quote Originally Posted by Rubberman View Post
    Updating one version to another minor update of the same, such as 5.6 to 5.7, or 6.0 to 6.1, is not hard - the standard install DVD images allow this. To update from one major version to another REALLY requires a full reinstall. IE, it will take time, you need to backup all your data and configuration files, and reinstall EVERYTHING. I moved from CentOS (RHEL) 5.5 to 6.0 on my workstation/server, and that's what I had to do. You CAN try to do the update in-situ, but make sure you do a full bit-image backup of your system drive before you do, because you will probably have to restore it to the previous state at least once...
    Would you recommend someone to upgrade their 32 bit to 64?

  7. #6
    Linux Guru Rubberman's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Foreclosure View Post
    Would you recommend someone to upgrade their 32 bit to 64?
    If you have a 64-bit capable system, absolutely yes! A 64-bit system can still run 32-bit applications, but not vice-versa. As suggested previously, make sure you have a full bit-image backup of your system before you do this, however! Murphy loves it when we are not prepared for his visitations...
    Sometimes, real fast is almost as good as real time.
    Just remember, Semper Gumbi - always be flexible!

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