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If you want to do an actual build of 4.5 (I did that on CentOS 5.x) and then install it, that is not a problem, and it won't interfere with ...
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  1. #11
    Linux Guru Rubberman's Avatar
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    If you want to do an actual build of 4.5 (I did that on CentOS 5.x) and then install it, that is not a problem, and it won't interfere with the standard gcc installation. I don't remember for sure, but I believe that it will create executables such as gcc45, g++45, etc. The shared libraries installed with the suite that the compilers and linker use will have a different numbering so they won't interfere with the default system ones. In any case, DO NOT uninstall your old gcc suite unless you are looking for a LOT of problems running your system. If you do, use yum to uninstall it. It will show you a list of what else will be uninstalled because of dependencies on components, and give you a chance to opt out before you go and shoot yourself in the foot! On my SL 6.0 (RHEL 6.0) workstation, that would include such things as dkms (dynamic kernel module system) which is needed to reinstall a lot of drivers when the kernel is changed, parts of Java 5.0, libtool, systemtap, a bunch of other languages I use (R, clang/objective-c, haskell) and such. I also have 3.4 installed on my system. So, it may or may not be a disaster to uninstall it first, but do be careful!
    Sometimes, real fast is almost as good as real time.
    Just remember, Semper Gumbi - always be flexible!

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    Quote Originally Posted by Jonathan183 View Post
    A package manager will manage packages for you ... it won't stop you destroying your system ! the package manager is also a package which can be removed ... just because you can doesn't mean you should
    I would put it rather that the package manager will elegantly and efficiently help you destroy your system! Yes, you are right, you must exercise prudence when removing packages, but that is the same whether you are using yum, rpm, apt-get, pacman, or rm. My point is, if a package needs to be removed, it should and can be safely removed from the system with the package manager. If this proves to be bad, it is a simple task to reinstall said package(s).

    In this case, though, flat out removing gcc would probably be unwise, unless a known valid replacement gcc package (available as a standalone RPM or in a yum repo) was readily available.

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    Quote Originally Posted by atreyu View Post

    It would probably be quicker to first try and install gcc 4.5 to an alternate location (like /opt or /usr/local) like has been suggested, and see if the customer RPM will then install. If that doesn't work, then maybe you'll have to roll your own RPM.
    Thanks, I'm going to give this a try first. Since it is only going to be needed for one of our systems, I'll forgo the creation of an RPM for the time being and just build it in a separate location from source.


    Thank you everyone for your input. It has given me a valuable insight!!

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    Linux Guru Rubberman's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by violentwind View Post
    Thanks, I'm going to give this a try first. Since it is only going to be needed for one of our systems, I'll forgo the creation of an RPM for the time being and just build it in a separate location from source.


    Thank you everyone for your input. It has given me a valuable insight!!
    Well, I have to disagree with atreyu ( this doesn't often happen! ) about installing gcc 4.5 to alternate locations. Let it install as gcc45, and then edit the Makefile(s) so that CC=gcc45 and CPP=g++45 in order to use the new compilers. This is the "standard" way of doing this. Trust me, I and my wife have between us about 60 years of Unix/Linux software development experience, and we do it this way!
    Sometimes, real fast is almost as good as real time.
    Just remember, Semper Gumbi - always be flexible!

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    Quote Originally Posted by Rubberman View Post
    Well, I have to disagree with atreyu ( this doesn't often happen! ) about installing gcc 4.5 to alternate locations. Let it install as gcc45, and then edit the Makefile(s) so that CC=gcc45 and CPP=g++45 in order to use the new compilers. This is the "standard" way of doing this. Trust me, I and my wife have between us about 60 years of Unix/Linux software development experience, and we do it this way!
    oh yeah? well, i have (counting fingers...) about 2 1/2 years of compiling experience...never mind...

  6. #16
    Linux Guru Rubberman's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by atreyu View Post
    oh yeah? well, i have (counting fingers...) about 2 1/2 years of compiling experience...never mind...
    Well atreyu, I have found that time != wisdom... And I think that generally, you have a lot of that! And to tell the truth, you have taught me, an old bear, a few things about where the honey is found!
    Sometimes, real fast is almost as good as real time.
    Just remember, Semper Gumbi - always be flexible!

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    Quote Originally Posted by Rubberman View Post
    Well, I have to disagree with atreyu ( this doesn't often happen! ) about installing gcc 4.5 to alternate locations. Let it install as gcc45, and then edit the Makefile(s) so that CC=gcc45 and CPP=g++45 in order to use the new compilers. This is the "standard" way of doing this. Trust me, I and my wife have between us about 60 years of Unix/Linux software development experience, and we do it this way!
    Why would you not install it in a separate location? Does this present unapparent problems?

  8. #18
    Linux Guru Rubberman's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by violentwind View Post
    Why would you not install it in a separate location? Does this present unapparent problems?
    It depends upon whether or not the package provides support for that. Usually, if there is a configure script, it will let you specify the root location to install the package and its parts, normally defaulting to /usr/local. However, some don't do that, and have other means to avoid conflicts with existing packages. GCC is one such of the latter. In any case, attached is a copy of the installation documentation as a gzipped tarball for 4.5 that you can read in your browser for more information. Just extract the files and start with either index.html or configure.html. The configure.html file has all of the information you need to properly configure gcc 4.5 - enjoy!
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    Sometimes, real fast is almost as good as real time.
    Just remember, Semper Gumbi - always be flexible!

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