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a Virtual Machine (VM) under KVM is a process with threads. in the host /proc/ file system under this process appear threads by the number of vcpus allocated to the ...
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    /proc file system data for Virtual machine process (KVM originated)


    a Virtual Machine (VM) under KVM is a process with threads.
    in the host /proc/ file system under this process appear threads by the number of vcpus allocated to the VM
    (see /proc/<VM process ID>/task/ ) at VM generation time.
    when the VM is idle or CPU bound we see at the host only these vcpu threads .If a combined cpu and i/o load is run on the VM - some other threads appear under the VM process . Those addtional threads appear to be sleeping or in Disk wait state . I cannot track them in running state . If they do use a CPU -do they run on the VM vcpu threads ( which serve them as worker threads) or they use host CPUs allocated to them separately at the expense of the vcpu threads ?

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    Linux Guru Rubberman's Avatar
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    Great question! Unfortunately, I am clueless here! I understand that when you tell the VMM that a specific VM will utilize 2 cores, then it will allocate a thread for each, allowing the VM threads to switch as necessary to available cores. Other than that, I haven't delved into the murky guts of the KVM. With luck, I won't ever have to! As they say, if the magic works, who cares? My current work problems are much more mundane, but difficult nonetheless. I think I'll keep my intellect on those problems since that work will affect the success of many 100's or 1000's of people and their careers...
    Sometimes, real fast is almost as good as real time.
    Just remember, Semper Gumbi - always be flexible!

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