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I recently compiled and installed a kernel 2.6.36 in the place of an older kernel, but one of the two problems that came up was that during the boot process ...
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  1. #1
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    Two problems after changing the kernel


    I recently compiled and installed a kernel 2.6.36 in the place of an older kernel, but one of the two problems that came up was that during the boot process a message similar to
    fs Usbdevfs cannot be mounted
    shows up.

    I guess that means that no usb device should be working in the newer kernel, however I am here writing this using my usb keyboard and my usb mouse, so what that could mean?

    The other is this message:
    Applying iptables firewall rules: iptables-restore: line 20 failed"
    that comes up during the boot or when I try to start the service through
    sbin/service iptables --full-restart
    That happens only with the new kernel 2.6.36.3 that I recently compiled and installed.

    So I searched for files with
    find / -name *iptables*
    and the only thing that came were the initialization scripts from rc2.d to rc5.d.

    I then gave a look into rc5.d and the 20th line was a blank line.

    So were I should look for the 20th line? Or anything else that I can do localize the problem?

    Thanks for the help

  2. #2
    Linux Guru Lazydog's Avatar
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    When IPTABLES starts it reads the file /etc/sysconfig/iptables.

    I will however ask what problem you were trying to fix that lead you to compiling your own kernel?

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    Robert

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  3. #3
    Linux Guru Rubberman's Avatar
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    What was the version of the previous kernel?
    Sometimes, real fast is almost as good as real time.
    Just remember, Semper Gumbi - always be flexible!

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    I will however ask what problem you were trying to fix that lead you to compiling your own kernel?
    No problem, but I needed a newer kernel because I have an ext4 partition on my system.



    What was the version of the previous kernel
    2.6.5-1.358

    Anyway I think I figured out the problem: my current iptables is older than the minimum required by the kernel 2.6.36. So I got, configured and compiled a newer version of iptables. But I still didn't issue a "make install" command because I am a bit afraid that this can lead to conflicts with the older version. Or is my concerning nonsense? If it is not, what files I shall remove? (I know I can use yum to remove it, but I prefer to do so manually)

    Still no idea about what can be the possible usb problem.

  5. #5
    Linux Guru Lazydog's Avatar
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    What version of Redhat/CentOS/Fedora are you running? when you start to change things on the system by adding upgrades you also introduce possibilities of an unstable system. I would stick to the yum repos maybe add the plus repos.

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    Linux Guru Rubberman's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by uelcon View Post
    No problem, but I needed a newer kernel because I have an ext4 partition on my system.

    2.6.5-1.358

    Anyway I think I figured out the problem: my current iptables is older than the minimum required by the kernel 2.6.36. So I got, configured and compiled a newer version of iptables. But I still didn't issue a "make install" command because I am a bit afraid that this can lead to conflicts with the older version. Or is my concerning nonsense? If it is not, what files I shall remove? (I know I can use yum to remove it, but I prefer to do so manually)

    Still no idea about what can be the possible usb problem.
    1. Look at online documentation to see if there is likely to be a problem, assuming you haven't already.
    2. Backup old iptables data and executables - preferably make a complete system backup.
    3. Install new version
    4. If necessary, convert old iptables data.
    5. Reboot and see if things are working as expected (hoped).
    Sometimes, real fast is almost as good as real time.
    Just remember, Semper Gumbi - always be flexible!

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    Quote Originally Posted by Lazydog View Post
    What version of Redhat/CentOS/Fedora are you running? when you start to change things on the system by adding upgrades you also introduce possibilities of an unstable system. I would stick to the yum repos maybe add the plus repos.
    Fedora 2. I don't know these plus repos, but the newer repos to fedora 2 that I found are too old, the packages there are older than the minimum required by the newer kernel. Besides, I prefer to install things manually


    Quote Originally Posted by Rubberman View Post
    5. Reboot and see if things are working as expected (hoped).
    Unfortunately they aren't. I did make install, rebooted and the
    Applying iptables firewall rules: iptables-restore: line 20 failed"
    message keeps showing up.

    I checked the line 20 of /etc/sysconfig/iptables. and the only thing there is: "COMMIT" . It is the last line of the file

    What else I can do?

  8. #8
    Linux Guru Lazydog's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by uelcon View Post
    Fedora 2. I don't know these plus repos, but the newer repos to fedora 2 that I found are too old, the packages there are older than the minimum required by the newer kernel. Besides, I prefer to install things manually
    Yeah, that is because Fedora 2 is no longer being supported. You need to install the newest version of Fedora. And then continue to do so every few years to stay on top. Fedora is the testbed for Redhat and moves along regularly.

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    Robert

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    Linux Guru Rubberman's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Lazydog View Post
    Yeah, that is because Fedora 2 is no longer being supported. You need to install the newest version of Fedora. And then continue to do so every few years to stay on top. Fedora is the testbed for Redhat and moves along regularly.
    Yes - "stable" Fedora == RHEL or clones (CentOS, Scientific Linux, etc).
    Sometimes, real fast is almost as good as real time.
    Just remember, Semper Gumbi - always be flexible!

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