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I been reading up on GoboLinux and apparently it retains backward compatibility with the traditional Linux architecture while it has its own filesystem architecture. I been trying to understand the ...
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    gobolinux file architecture


    I been reading up on GoboLinux and apparently it retains backward compatibility with the traditional Linux architecture while it has its own filesystem architecture. I been trying to understand the differences between the different Linux distros but all I have come up with is that they use different package managers. So does that mean RHEL software would be compatible with GoboLinux?

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    oz
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    Quote Originally Posted by stampmagnet View Post
    So does that mean RHEL software would be compatible with GoboLinux?
    Hello and welcome!

    No, I don't think you'll be able to use red hat RPM packages with gobo unless you can convert them to be compatible in some way. If that's wrong, I'm sure someone will reply with a correction. Either way, you can find an article about package management under gobo here:

    Packages - GoboLinux
    oz

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    so is the only difference between the two distros the package management?

    if so wouldn't an easy solution would be to create an internal bridge between the two package management systems?

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    Quote Originally Posted by stampmagnet View Post
    so is the only difference between the two distros the package management?

    if so wouldn't an easy solution would be to create an internal bridge between the two package management systems?
    Package management is generally the biggest difference between various distributions, but there are usually other differences as well, such as initial packages installed, patches that might be installed, and other changes that a developer might want to implement.

    No, trying to make a package manager for a different distribution work with gobo probably won't be an "easy solution", but I wouldn't say that it's impossible. If you don't like gobo's package management system, I'd recommend moving to a distribution with a package tool that you do like. That would certainly be the easiest approach, in my opinion.
    oz

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    Quote Originally Posted by stampmagnet View Post
    so is the only difference between the two distros the package management?
    As Oz said, package management is the biggest difference between distributions. The second biggest difference is the default selection of software and default system settings. Linux alone is just a kernel, and you can attach whatever components you want to it. But it always astonishes me as to how many components there are in an operating system, and making them work together takes a lot of time and dedication. In my opinion, its just best to just choose a distribution that is easy to use and has a lot of packages in it's public repository.
    Quote Originally Posted by stampmagnet View Post
    if so wouldn't an easy solution would be to create an internal bridge between the two package management systems?
    I know for a fact that Ubuntu, and probably most Debian-based distributions, have the "rpm" package, which lets you install RedHat-based system packages. You can install it with the command:
    Code:
    sudo apt-get install rpm
    I have never used it before, but they probably set it up so that packages installed through RPM are placed in a different location, like "/opt" or "/usr/local" instead of the usual "/usr" directory, to prevent you from accidentally overwriting/re-configuring installed software that your system depends on to function.

    Debian also provides the "alien" program, installed with:
    Code:
    sudo apt-get install alien
    which according to its description:
    allows you to convert LSB, Red Hat (RPM), Stampede and Slackware Packages into Debian packages, which can be installed with dpkg.
    Where "dpkg" is the back-end to "apt-get" that does the actuall installing of stuff. (Apt-get does the job of resolving package dependencies, connecting to the internet, and checking the security signatures of downloaded dpkg files.)

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    I was interested in taking the CentOS distro and getting a distro that while still fully compatible with RHEL would use the GoboLinux file system and I was wondering if that was possible.

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    GoboLinux is an awesome idea, but its package management and the high-level structure of the filesystem is so radically different from traditional Linux/UNIX that I highly recommend you do NOT mix the two together, unless you really know what you are doing.

    In GoboLinux, they place symbolic links to everything in the "traditional" locations, like "/etc" and "/usr/bin" so legacy programs can run smoothly, while organizing the actual program data according to the GoboLinux rules. These rules are what make GoboLinux what it is.

    Now, CentOS of course uses RPM, and RPM files contain instructions which allow installation to occur, and nothing will keep you from executing these instructions. But these instructions are written under the assumption that configuration files are clumped together in "/etc", user-land files are all clumped together in "/usr", and so forth. The purpose of GoboLinux is get rid of this behavior and to take advantage of the new filesystem organization, and RPM files are just not programmed to do this.

    For example, lets say you want to install XChat. If you use GoboLinux's "InstallPackage" program, it will automatically store all the XChat files, including the "xchat" executable in its own well-organized directory, then link "xchat" to "/usr/bin/xchat" so that older software can use the "/usr/bin/xchat" program transparently. But if you use RPM, it will not install XChat into its own directory, it will just do what it has always done and dump everything into "/usr/bin" and "/etc" and so on. So your GoboLinux has just been all cluttered-up by a "stupid" program that didn't understand the GoboLinux file organization.

    As far as I know, there is no conversion program to convert RPMs or DEBs to GoboLinux package files yet. However it is absolutely possible to do this, so ask around the GoboLinux forums to see if anyone is working on such a project.

    You can "convert" RPM files yourself by hand, but it is not easy. Check out the GoboLinux Wiki on Packages for instructions on how to make your own GoboLinux packages.

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    Code:
    As far as I know, there is no conversion program to convert RPMs or DEBs to GoboLinux package files yet. However it is absolutely possible to do this, so ask around the GoboLinux forums to see if anyone is working on such a project.
    so then it would be entirely possible to make GoboLinux 100% compatible with RHEL?

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    Quote Originally Posted by stampmagnet View Post
    Quote Originally Posted by ramin.honary View Post
    As far as I know, there is no conversion program to convert RPMs or DEBs to GoboLinux package files yet. However it is absolutely possible to do this, so ask around the GoboLinux forums to see if anyone is working on such a project.
    so then it would be entirely possible to make GoboLinux 100% compatible with RHEL?
    Theoretically, it would be possible to convert any RPM packages from the RHEL repository to a GoboLinux package. Theoretically, you could make a command like "GoboYum" which installs a RPM like the "yum" program would do, except the installation first converts all target file paths to GoboLinux equalivent paths and then executes the installation so the RHEL package is safely installed according to the GoboLinux rules.

    But in practice there is always some difficulty in implementation. The problem is always human error: when human programmers write code assuming the machine is configured in a certain way (for example, "/usr" and "/usr/local" being separate mounts), then if you break this assumption errors will very likely occur.

    That is why doing this "conversion" from RPM to GoboLinux Packages may actually be very very difficult to do, which may be why no one has done it before.

    Like I said, ask the GoboLinux forums or mailing lists, and see if anyone is working on this project. Maybe they tried it before but gave up, and they can tell you why it was too difficult. Or maybe they are working on it right now and will release it soon! But you must ask them.

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    so then the problem lies with not being thorough and making assumptions.

    everytime i asked anything about a simpler file system or said that GUI is better than CLI I had a bunch of people angry saying that the current file system architecture is way better.

    The GoboLinux project is dormant. I am contacting because I am a software architect (though never really worked much with Linux) and the company wants to start using Linux for their products.

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