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Just installed Fedora 17. On both Ubuntu and Mint I had to edit some graphics config file at boot in order to be able to boot into a non-graphics driven ...
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  1. #1
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    How do I edit Fedora at boot to get into non-graphics driven GUI?


    Just installed Fedora 17. On both Ubuntu and Mint I had to edit some graphics config file at boot in order to be able to boot into a non-graphics driven desktop. Then after that I installed AMD graphics drivers and rebooted to a sleek nice looking desktop.

    But the config file is different for Fedora. At boot I did press "shift" and then "e" to get into the the config file but since it was not the same as on Mint and Ubuntu I didn't know what commands to add to what lines. In Ubuntu and Mint you have to add "nomodeset" to a line. How do I accomplish the same thing in Fedora. Because as of right now I am unable to boot to desktop. It is just a blank off colored screen. I should also mention that in Ubuntu and Mint it did allow me to boot to a minimally driven desktop in the repair mode menu. I attempted to enter into repair mode in Fedora but it just gave me a black screen that didn't change with time.

    Now I would like to make an official complaint. Why? Why is this still a problem in Fedora after all these years. For somebody like me who enjoys wrestling with my system it is no big deal, but for average Linux newbie this can be very discouraging. It would not be difficult to fix this at all. All you would have to do is do it just like Microsoft Windows does. Just don't to set desktop gui to accelerated graphics mode until after the user has manually installed the necessary drivers. Let the default boot be to a minimally driven GUI at first and then prompt to install proprietary AMD drivers.

    I guarantee you that at least every 1 out of 5 Linux newbies who encounter this hazy screen of death walk away and never come back. This problem has persisted for years. I guess somebody out there just doesn't feel that it is important enough to change.

    I do admit I am relatively unseasoned in Linux but this particular problem is easily identifiable and definitely needs to be addressed by the development team.

    My hardware setup:
    Intel 8400 Wolfdale
    Asus P5QL Pro
    4 GB DDR3 Gskill RAM
    Radeon HD 6670 graphics card

  2. #2
    Penguin of trust elija's Avatar
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    When you get the hazy looking screen, can you press Alt + F2 to get a terminal login? If so log in there and install the drivers; I haven't used AMD since before I switched to Linux and am trying Fedora seriously for the first time since version 12 so can't help with specifics on driver installation.
    What do we want?
    Time machines!

    When do we want 'em?
    Doesn't really matter does it!?


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  3. #3
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    Just add a 3 2 or 1 to the end of the grub line for the appropriate run level you desire.
    1 is single user mode.
    2 is multi user mode, no networking.
    3 is multi user mode, with networking.

    By default, all 3 of those run levels should start command-line only.

  4. #4
    Penguin of trust elija's Avatar
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    That is really simple. Nice.
    What do we want?
    Time machines!

    When do we want 'em?
    Doesn't really matter does it!?


    The Fifth Continent

  5. #5
    Linux Enthusiast Mudgen's Avatar
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    This is another consequence of the Gnome 3 debacle. It requires hardware acceleration, which precludes the old workaround of using the generic xdriver=vesa to get things working enough to install proper graphics drivers. It appears that AMD has gotten its chipsets out in front of the xorg open source ati drivers again, without backward compatibility. The 6xx0 cards are known for being especially problematic, I think.

    You don't say how or which drivers you're going to install, but I'll point out that the Catalyst proprietary drivers are in the rpmfusion-nonfree repo. If you set up and enable that repo, and install your drivers from it, you'll have an ongoing upgrade path rather than having to keep checking at AMD for driver updates and downloading them.

  6. #6
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    Quote Originally Posted by Mudgen View Post
    This is another consequence of the Gnome 3 debacle. It requires hardware acceleration, which precludes the old workaround of using the generic xdriver=vesa to get things working enough to install proper graphics drivers. It appears that AMD has gotten its chipsets out in front of the xorg open source ati drivers again, without backward compatibility. The 6xx0 cards are known for being especially problematic, I think.

    You don't say how or which drivers you're going to install, but I'll point out that the Catalyst proprietary drivers are in the rpmfusion-nonfree repo. If you set up and enable that repo, and install your drivers from it, you'll have an ongoing upgrade path rather than having to keep checking at AMD for driver updates and downloading them.
    I have a few things I would like to know:

    1. How can I find out in terminal which graphics drivers are installed.
    2. What is the command to uninstall the graphics drivers.
    3. What is the command to find which version of RHEL you are running.
    4. In what folder are mesa drivers installed and how can I uninstall mesa drivers.

    I attempted to install mesa drivers with the command:

    # yum install mesa-dri-drivers

    and it told me they were already installed. How do i uninstall them. There are other question I have but first I would like to find out these.

    Thanks for any help you could provide. Oh and rest assured I already spent a few hours trying to research these things online.

  7. #7
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    Quote Originally Posted by papazulu View Post
    I have a few things I would like to know:

    1. How can I find out in terminal which graphics drivers are installed.
    2. What is the command to uninstall the graphics drivers.
    3. What is the command to find which version of RHEL you are running.
    4. In what folder are mesa drivers installed and how can I uninstall mesa drivers.

    I attempted to install mesa drivers with the command:

    # yum install mesa-dri-drivers

    and it told me they were already installed. How do i uninstall them. There are other question I have but first I would like to find out these.

    Thanks for any help you could provide. Oh and rest assured I already spent a few hours trying to research these things online.
    To find out the version of RHEL (i thought you were running Fedora):

    Code:
    cat /etc/redhat-release
    If you've not upgraded the kernel,
    Code:
    uname -r
    will give you the kernel version, which will allow you to look for the version of RHEL that uses that kernel.

    To uninstall the drivers, use this

    Code:
    yum remove mesa-dri-drivers
    Not sure about your other questions

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