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All, I am in need of some feedback for a good monitoring tool for checking out existing load on a LAMP server. We run a couple of instances of Moodle ...
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  1. #1
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    What is the best tool for monitoring LAMP Server


    All, I am in need of some feedback for a good monitoring tool for checking out existing load on a LAMP server. We run a couple of instances of Moodle on this box and are thinking of adding another one that could add quite a bit of traffic. What I want to do is get an idea of the load on the box and extrapolate out, how much it can handle. I have been looking at Munin - Trac and Nagios - The Industry Standard in IT Infrastructure Monitoring . It is my understanding that nagios is the standard, but I have read that munin is simpler. I don't need a lot of alerts or anything, just need to know what the box can handle.

  2. #2
    Trusted Penguin Irithori's Avatar
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    Munin is simpler then nagios.
    Then again, nagios has much more plugins and arguably a bigger community.
    I use Xymon to monitor several hundred machines.

    Whatever floats your boat
    In your case you might want to look which monitoring systems are natively available in your distributionīs repository
    and then start with a small one, as you only have a few machines.
    Last edited by Irithori; 07-10-2012 at 03:53 PM.
    You must always face the curtain with a bow.

  3. #3
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    It is actually only 1 box in CentOS, so I will probably go with Munin or something similar.

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  5. #4
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    If your just looking to get alerts and do not need graphs. You may want to look at monit. It allows monitoring of any service and you can trigger active responses such as a restart of the service or an email upon hitting the trigger. Also can be configured for things like load, and disk utilization.

    Just do a quick google on 'monit' to find the site and many how-to's and guides on installation and configuration.

    Hope that provides another possible solution.

    No-Mad

  6. #5
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    Thanks for the tip. I don't need notifications on this box, but I will probably use the combination of munin and monit on a different box. I do have one quick question. I want to restrict only authenticated users to access the data grabbed by munin, so normally, I would use a .htaccess file, but after reviewing the current Apach.org documentation for .htaccess they state that it is better to do this in main configuration. This box hosts multiple sites, so I don't want to require user authentication for all sites. My question is, can you do this without a .htaccess file for just a single virtual host in apache?

    ******Edit*****
    Nevermind, I found it out later in the documentation (I know, I know rtfm, right?). Turns out, you just put it in the virtual host under a location tag.

    Here is the link to the page I read this on: Apache Tutorial: .htaccess files - Apache HTTP Server
    Here is the quote:
    In general, you should never use .htaccess files unless you don't have access to the main server configuration file. There is, for example, a prevailing misconception that user authentication should always be done in .htaccess files. This is simply not the case. You can put user authentication configurations in the main server configuration, and this is, in fact, the preferred way to do things.

    .htaccess files should be used in a case where the content providers need to make configuration changes to the server on a per-directory basis, but do not have root access on the server system. In the event that the server administrator is not willing to make frequent configuration changes, it might be desirable to permit individual users to make these changes in .htaccess files for themselves. This is particularly true, for example, in cases where ISPs are hosting multiple user sites on a single machine, and want their users to be able to alter their configuration.
    Last edited by ktech11; 07-13-2012 at 03:01 PM.

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