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ratib, I've never configured a Broadcom wireless device with any distro but in my opinion, Mint Linux is among the most user friendly Linux distros available and also has a ...
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  1. #11
    Trusted Penguin Dapper Dan's Avatar
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    ratib, I've never configured a Broadcom wireless device with any distro but in my opinion, Mint Linux is among the most user friendly Linux distros available and also has a wide base of support like Red Hat / Fedora. Mint does a fabulous job finding and configuring wireless. If you have the resources, consider Mint with a full desktop environment like KDE or, if you have an older machine or less resources, XFCE. A newer version of Fedora might do well but Fedora is pretty cutting edge and, again in my opinion, should be reserved for when you have more Linux experience. There are other user friendly distros out there. I'm sure others will chime in with good suggestions.
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  2. #12
    Administrator jayd512's Avatar
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    I'm with Dan on this.
    Mint, or even one of the recent *buntus, should do a pretty good job of detecting your wireless.
    Jay

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  3. #13
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    Quote Originally Posted by ratib View Post
    Code:
    uname -r
    the output is : 2.6.18-128.el5PAE
    That sounds more like Red Hat Enterprise Linux, or maybe CentOS, than Fedora. Version 5.3 probably. In any event, yeah, old.

    I would try Fedora 17, if I were you. It is backed by Red Hat and works quite well with many wireless devices. Here's the download page:

    Fedora Project - Download Fedora and try it.

    Note that you can try it as a Live OS before you go the installation route. That way, you can see how easy/hard it will be to get wireless up and running. For that matter, you can do the same thing (boot in Live OS mode) with most other major distros (like Ubuntu or Linux Mint).

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