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Hi, I am new to linux. I have installed redhat enterprise server 6 on my machine. I want to install oracle database (11g R2) on it. I have created a ...
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  1. #1
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    Question How to create a user in linux who can install any application?


    Hi,

    I am new to linux.

    I have installed redhat enterprise server 6 on my machine.

    I want to install oracle database (11g R2) on it.

    I have created a user OracleUser using useradd command.

    Do I need to grant any permissions/rights/priviledges to this user so that it can install the software?

    Regards,
    Vishal

  2. #2
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    It is possible for a regular user to install software, but it requires the software to be installed into a directory owned by the user, in your case, OracleUser. The software will only be accessible to that one user and this will work, provided the program does not need privledged access to system resources. This type of install will require adding modifiing config files and other steps to work properly.

    I can't say for Oracle, but typically, Linux services, like databases and web servers, are installed by root into the standard /usr/lib64, /usr/share, /usr/bin, and /var/lib directories, so no special path configuration is required. At run time, the process is started by root, then drops its priviledges and runs as a regular user. Again, typically, the software, in this case, Oracle database, will have its own defined user name. If you are concerned about having root run the database, the dropping of priviledges is likely what you want as the process only runs as root for a few milliseconds during start up. Installing as a regular user would accomplish the same thing, but it requires changing the default permissions of the software's programs, data files, and directories.

    As a new Linux user, it may be best to do a standard install of the software as root, get it working, and get to know how it works in standard mode. This will make following tutorials and how-tos easier, as everything will work as documented. Once you are familiar with how the package works as a whole, you can do a user specific install, if you still want/need to, as, by then, you will know which config files/settings, etc. will be needed modified.

    Hope it helps.
    Dapper Dan likes this.

  3. #3
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    Hi,

    Thanks for the reply. I'll try to install it as a root user.

    one more question: If I install the db as a root user, will other users be able to use it? or Do I need to assign them some permissions to use it?

    Regards,
    Vishal

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  5. #4
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    I am speaking from experience of PostgreSQL and MySQL. Those databases, in the standard install by root, will run as 'postgres' and 'mysql' users by default. Access to the databases is granted via the db program's internal user administration. Oracle's database should have some kind database and user manager program. PostgreSQL has PG3Admin, and MySQL has MySQL-Workbench, but I don't Oracle, so I don't know the name of their program. It will be in Oracle's docs. They will have a quick start guide, too, most likely. Just be sure the guide you follow is for the version you are using, or close to it, as using an out of date document will result in confusion.

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