Find the answer to your Linux question:
Page 1 of 2 1 2 LastLast
Results 1 to 10 of 11
New Motherboard uses onboard Nvidia, which I suspect has something to do with it. As it boots, it runs through detecting new USB devices, then hangs after it finishes installing ...
Enjoy an ad free experience by logging in. Not a member yet? Register.
  1. #1
    Just Joined!
    Join Date
    Jan 2013
    Location
    Dallas, TX
    Posts
    5

    Fedora hangs on boot after Motherboard/CPU upgrade


    New Motherboard uses onboard Nvidia, which I suspect has something to do with it. As it boots, it runs through detecting new USB devices, then hangs after it finishes installing my keyboard.

    Same results even after I add 3 or 1 to the kernel argument to change runlevel, and removing rhgb.

    Actually, I just discovered that it's not so much hung, because if I disconnect the mouse and keyboard it will show "USB Disconnect" then reconnecting runs through the "new low speed USB device using..."

    Any ideas on how I can boot back into the Fedora desktop and get my webserver running again?

  2. #2
    Linux Guru Rubberman's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2009
    Location
    I can be found either 40 miles west of Chicago, in Chicago, or in a galaxy far, far away.
    Posts
    11,568
    Mistake #1 - making major hardware upgrades without reinstalling the operating system. You might be able to boot from an installation disc that has a recovery boot option, which may interrogate the hardware and install the correct drivers for you. Some Red Hat based distributions will provide this capability. What version of Fedora are you using?
    Sometimes, real fast is almost as good as real time.
    Just remember, Semper Gumbi - always be flexible!

  3. #3
    Just Joined!
    Join Date
    Jan 2013
    Location
    Dallas, TX
    Posts
    5
    I believe it's Fedora Core 3 - right now I reinstalled the old motherboard and everything's come up fine. The issue is that the server hosts 3 small websites and some perl based discussion forums, so I was worried that I wouldn't be able to stand everything back up correctly if I did a full reinstall. I'd like to use the new mainboard and cpu though - what's the best way to try that without basically reformatting everything and starting over?

  4. #4
    oz
    oz is offline
    forum.guy
    Join Date
    May 2004
    Location
    arch linux
    Posts
    18,733
    Quote Originally Posted by Richter12x2 View Post
    I believe it's Fedora Core 3 - right now I reinstalled the old motherboard and everything's come up fine. The issue is that the server hosts 3 small websites and some perl based discussion forums, so I was worried that I wouldn't be able to stand everything back up correctly if I did a full reinstall. I'd like to use the new mainboard and cpu though - what's the best way to try that without basically reformatting everything and starting over?
    Hello and welcome!

    Fedora Core 3 is very old now (Nov 2004) and the kernel would undoubtedly be missing a lot of drivers needed for the latest computer components unless you've taken time to keep it current along the way. I'd recommend reinstalling from scratch with a much fresher release using your chosen distribution.

    Depending on your new hardware, you might also have to keep an eye out for any UEFI secure boot issues:

    http://www.linuxfoundation.org/publi...open-platforms
    oz

  5. #5
    Linux Guru Rubberman's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2009
    Location
    I can be found either 40 miles west of Chicago, in Chicago, or in a galaxy far, far away.
    Posts
    11,568
    Backup all of your data - web pages, configurations, etc. I'd advise a full bit-image backup of the HD "just in case". Then, install then new mobo/cpu/etc and a more current version of the operating system of your preference, along with the appropriate web servers, etc. Finally, copy back the web server data and configurations to the new system (some bit-twiddling may be required here), and check it out. With a full external bit-image backup, if you need, you can restore your old system simply enough. If I were doing this for you as a consultant/contractor, that is the process I would use.
    Sometimes, real fast is almost as good as real time.
    Just remember, Semper Gumbi - always be flexible!

  6. #6
    Just Joined!
    Join Date
    Jan 2013
    Location
    Dallas, TX
    Posts
    5
    I doublechecked, and it turns out it's just Fedora 11, Leonidas, which is still pretty old. I'm going to do the whole bit backup as suggested (actually, I'm going to swap harddrives and do a clean install on new harddrive, then mount the old harddrive to move things over, as those harddrives are probably 10 years old as well!) I think I'm going to use Ubuntu as the main OS though, because I actually use that everyday for a few desktops and I'm a little more familiar.

    The downside of having using Linux as a webserver is that since it stays up for over 8 years with no issues, it's hard to remember how you set it all up in the beginning!

    Thanks for all of your help!

  7. #7
    Linux Guru Rubberman's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2009
    Location
    I can be found either 40 miles west of Chicago, in Chicago, or in a galaxy far, far away.
    Posts
    11,568
    Since you are running Fedora 11, I would suggest upgrading to a Red Hat Enterprise Linux clone such as CentOS or Scientific Linux. Some of your programs will be happier with that than Ubuntu. Anyway, good luck, and feel free to post here again as you move forward with your new gear!
    Sometimes, real fast is almost as good as real time.
    Just remember, Semper Gumbi - always be flexible!

  8. #8
    Just Joined!
    Join Date
    Jan 2013
    Location
    Dallas, TX
    Posts
    5
    I did feel concerned a bit about that - but it's literally only a webserver, as in, it just sits in its corner beeping merrily away running apache and a php discussion forum, and a ddns updater client. I'm just really liking how readily Ubuntu makes the install, and the automatic OS updates. I think Fedora's up to 17 now and I didn't even get a notification.

  9. #9
    Linux Guru Rubberman's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2009
    Location
    I can be found either 40 miles west of Chicago, in Chicago, or in a galaxy far, far away.
    Posts
    11,568
    Well, just remember that Fedora is where Red Hat vettes their latest code base before incorporating it into their paid-subscription enterprise product. Notices are optional - caveate user! RHEL (Red Hat Enterprise Linux) and clones also have automatic updates, and upgrades are handled generally quite well (that and $5 will get you a nice cuppa coffee at Starbucks). I can't say that I have enjoyed my Ubuntu upgrades. Software updates (bug and security fixes) are another issue, and either Ubuntu or Red Hat and clones do that very cleanly.

    For a production web server (working as senior systems/performance engineer for several thousand web servers), I have to recommend a clone of RHEL 6. The latest is 6.3, and CentOS is widely used and supported. There is also Scientific Linux, which is much the same (only the logos and splash screens differ). SL is maintained by our tax dollars at Fermi National Laboratory in Illinois. So, if you want to support the Linux community, get CentOS. If you want to feel that you are getting some return on your tax dollars, get Scientific Linux. Here are the links for both:

    www.centos.org - The Community ENTerprise Operating System
    Scientific Linux - Welcome to Scientific Linux (SL)
    Sometimes, real fast is almost as good as real time.
    Just remember, Semper Gumbi - always be flexible!

  10. #10
    Just Joined!
    Join Date
    Jan 2013
    Location
    Dallas, TX
    Posts
    5
    I tried Fedora on a clean install and it wouldn't work, but for that matter neither did any of the LongTermSupport versions of Ubuntu. As it turns out, the new motherboard uses UEFI, which somehow requires a signed key to install an Operating System. So far only a few distros seem to support UEFI, but one of them was the latest Ubuntu, Quantal Quetzal which installed fine although I had to go install the correct Radeon drivers after the fact. (I was mistaken about Nvidia.) All up and running now, and gave me a chance to replace the 10 year old hard drive that was in it as well.

Page 1 of 2 1 2 LastLast

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •