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My company is the Maintainer for at least one second level domain like example.com. The previous sysadmin created a DNS server running on a public IP address x.x.x.x which resolves ...
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  1. #1
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    Changing DNS Server Public IP


    My company is the Maintainer for at least one second level domain like example.com. The previous sysadmin created a DNS server running on a public IP address x.x.x.x which resolves "public" dns queries for that domain. Now we are migrating from one ISP to another and our public IP address will soon change in something like y.y.y.y. I think we will loose our DNS reachability. How can I avoid this? We also run a mail server inside our network and we don't want to loose mail server reachability.

  2. #2
    Trusted Penguin Irithori's Avatar
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    You need to have at least two new DNServers and run them in parallel to the old ones.
    Either use the ones offered by the new ISP or maintain own ones.

    You can start by reducing the ttl of your zone and then copying it, so that new and old DNS points to the same servers.
    Then modify the whois entry of your domain with the new DNS.

    Migrate all services to serve from the new public IPs.
    In best case, the services should still be available via the old public IPs for the migration time.

    Switch the host IPs in the zone to the new public IPs.
    Wait a few days, as even with reduced ttl some dns caches will hold the old IPs.

    Once there is no or neglectable traffic on the old IPs, shut them down.
    The contract with your old ISP is now ready for termination from a technical POV.
    You must always face the curtain with a bow.

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