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I have the current version as of today of Fuduntu 64 bit. I was looking at overclocking my intel dual core processor. Is there an app in the repo to ...
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    Overclocking on Fuduntu?


    I have the current version as of today of Fuduntu 64 bit. I was looking at overclocking my intel dual core processor. Is there an app in the repo to do this? Also, is this complicated to do? Any apps that might have ease of use tools? I have a 2.4GHz dual core and I was thinking maybe push to 2.8GHz on both cores?

    Any advice or help would be much appreciated.

    Thanks.

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    Linux Newbie Syndacate's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Levi88 View Post
    I have the current version as of today of Fuduntu 64 bit. I was looking at overclocking my intel dual core processor. Is there an app in the repo to do this? Also, is this complicated to do? Any apps that might have ease of use tools? I have a 2.4GHz dual core and I was thinking maybe push to 2.8GHz on both cores?

    Any advice or help would be much appreciated.

    Thanks.
    No offense, but if you're asking if it's complicated to do, you're probably not knowledgeable enough to where you should be messing with it.

    That being said...most people don't use apps to do it, unless they enjoy seeing kernel panics. OC'ing is best done through the BIOS. I would highly recommend that over any OS-land app.

    I suggest you google basic guides on overclocking, read what they have to say, take it from there. If you're asking "how do I overclock, is it hard", you're probably not ready to be messing with it.

    Though to answer your question, is it complicated: No, not really, so go read up on how to do it and what you're doing and you won't need this thread.

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    Quote Originally Posted by Syndacate View Post
    No offense, but if you're asking if it's complicated to do, you're probably not knowledgeable enough to where you should be messing with it.

    That being said...most people don't use apps to do it, unless they enjoy seeing kernel panics. OC'ing is best done through the BIOS. I would highly recommend that over any OS-land app.

    I suggest you google basic guides on overclocking, read what they have to say, take it from there. If you're asking "how do I overclock, is it hard", you're probably not ready to be messing with it.

    Though to answer your question, is it complicated: No, not really, so go read up on how to do it and what you're doing and you won't need this thread.
    Thanks. I learn fast and m good at following instructions. If I don't understand something, then I usually don't do it if it's risky until I do understand it. I did google it, but there are so many instructions and veriationsthat it is not clear to me and I find different answers too. I did find a site that gave OC program names for Linux and said they were fairly simple to use with some specific terminal commands, but I fail to find any such app on my package lists for my distro, which is Fuduntu 2013 current 64 bit. I taught myself how to root android phones and install custom OS's on them and have had 100% success as I did my research first. My problem is that I find too much info on this subject and was looking for a little guidance to a reliable source or someone so that I can do it. I found my bios update, but it's designed to be installed through Windows and I have yet to receive some sound advice and sources on doing it through Linux. I would feel safer with an app based OC as I don't wanna risk screwing up my bios. I don't use Windows at all and have no plans to get a copy just to update my bios

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    Linux Newbie Syndacate's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Levi88 View Post
    Thanks. I learn fast and m good at following instructions. If I don't understand something, then I usually don't do it if it's risky until I do understand it. I did google it, but there are so many instructions and veriationsthat it is not clear to me and I find different answers too. I did find a site that gave OC program names for Linux and said they were fairly simple to use with some specific terminal commands, but I fail to find any such app on my package lists for my distro, which is Fuduntu 2013 current 64 bit. I taught myself how to root android phones and install custom OS's on them and have had 100% success as I did my research first. My problem is that I find too much info on this subject and was looking for a little guidance to a reliable source or someone so that I can do it. I found my bios update, but it's designed to be installed through Windows and I have yet to receive some sound advice and sources on doing it through Linux. I would feel safer with an app based OC as I don't wanna risk screwing up my bios. I don't use Windows at all and have no plans to get a copy just to update my bios
    TBH I would update the BIOS through Windows. Reason being is it's a very high risk process and it's been tested and proven 6 ways from Sunday from an OEM for Windows. While I (or anybody else) may not agree with that, the truth is simply that it has the highest chance of success via Windows through an official OEM produced app than a 3rd party app, even if it is community created...it's not like a program where if it messes up, it just crashes.

    As for the app, if they don't release a deb package, you can compile it from source and install it. Maybe if you put the name of the app here somebody could help you with more specifics about installing it on your distro.

    As for information on overclocking, the reason why information is so weird is because different motherboards have different features, though it all boils down to the same crap. The process to go about it (menus and such) may simply be different. So your motherboard model # is also important, without that, you can't do much. Some mobos (most?) aren't supported by OC applications due to the wide variety of motherboards available. Also, some motherboards don't have OC'ing abilities, in which case you're **** out of luck. Though to be honest, I would trust OC'ing over the BIOS wayyyy before I trusted doing it from app land. Much less to go wrong with a much simpler system. No reason to add complexity to the process, especially not when temporary instabilities can end up bringing down the system. At least in the BIOS it's simple enough where you won't run into any weird situations that would lead to instability (unlikely, anyway).

    So google OC'ing your motherboard model #, processor matters little - the socket on that mobo has to match that processor (or the family, anyway), so the processor/family is assumed. Heat is the big thing when it comes to OC'ing. Another thing I might want to mention is that not all CPU's are created equal. Every CPU has error built into it from the manufacturing process. The higher quality ones become your higher quality processors, which often clock higher, more stable, etc. So because somebody else's <insert your CPU model # here> is running at 4Ghz, doesn't mean yours will. Some barely meet the minimum for QA to ship them out the door, so they won't accept any overclock.

    So not all processors are created equal, not even within a specific model processor. They're very individual, and OC"ing is slightly individualized based on the motherboard support.

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    Quote Originally Posted by Syndacate View Post
    TBH I would update the BIOS through Windows. Reason being is it's a very high risk process and it's been tested and proven 6 ways from Sunday from an OEM for Windows. While I (or anybody else) may not agree with that, the truth is simply that it has the highest chance of success via Windows through an official OEM produced app than a 3rd party app, even if it is community created...it's not like a program where if it messes up, it just crashes.

    As for the app, if they don't release a deb package, you can compile it from source and install it. Maybe if you put the name of the app here somebody could help you with more specifics about installing it on your distro.

    As for information on overclocking, the reason why information is so weird is because different motherboards have different features, though it all boils down to the same crap. The process to go about it (menus and such) may simply be different. So your motherboard model # is also important, without that, you can't do much. Some mobos (most?) aren't supported by OC applications due to the wide variety of motherboards available. Also, some motherboards don't have OC'ing abilities, in which case you're **** out of luck. Though to be honest, I would trust OC'ing over the BIOS wayyyy before I trusted doing it from app land. Much less to go wrong with a much simpler system. No reason to add complexity to the process, especially not when temporary instabilities can end up bringing down the system. At least in the BIOS it's simple enough where you won't run into any weird situations that would lead to instability (unlikely, anyway).

    So google OC'ing your motherboard model #, processor matters little - the socket on that mobo has to match that processor (or the family, anyway), so the processor/family is assumed. Heat is the big thing when it comes to OC'ing. Another thing I might want to mention is that not all CPU's are created equal. Every CPU has error built into it from the manufacturing process. The higher quality ones become your higher quality processors, which often clock higher, more stable, etc. So because somebody else's <insert your CPU model # here> is running at 4Ghz, doesn't mean yours will. Some barely meet the minimum for QA to ship them out the door, so they won't accept any overclock.

    So not all processors are created equal, not even within a specific model processor. They're very individual, and OC"ing is slightly individualized based on the motherboard support.
    Thank you for the advice. I didn't see any options on my bios for OC, but it is outdated. I have an HP Pavilion a6707c 2.4GHz Pentium dual core, 4GB DDR2 RAM and it has the Foxconn chipset with onboard Nvidea graphics. Also, I'm running the current 2013 Fuduntu 64 bit OS

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    Quote Originally Posted by Levi88 View Post
    Thank you for the advice. I didn't see any options on my bios for OC, but it is outdated. I have an HP Pavilion a6707c 2.4GHz Pentium dual core, 4GB DDR2 RAM and it has the Foxconn chipset with onboard Nvidea graphics. Also, I'm running the current 2013 Fuduntu 64 bit OS
    On most laptops, you will have 0 OC'ing abilities..even with a BIOS update. That's the case with most OEM systems.

    If you want to OC you really need your own mobo, like purchased from a company who sells their mobos to end users. Models that only sell to OEM's typically have all the OC abilities locked out from end-user access. OEM BIOS's are typically very very limited in terms of settings.

    Realistically I'd tell you to forget about OC'ing that, but maybe I'm wrong.

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    Here you can find media downloads for windows 7.
    Windows 7 Direct Download Links

    These are 100% legal as they are just for the iso images, and do not contain the software for pirating the activation keys. Microsoft includes a 30 day grace period where you can run windows 7 without purchasing a license. If all you're doing is flashing your BIOS, you can get a disk from that link, install it (this will wipe out your linux install,) and flash your bios. Then you can re-install linux. It's a pain in the behind, but I've had to use that method to perform similar functions in the past.
    New to the internet, technical forums, or the hacker / open source community??
    Read this to learn good posting habits http://www.catb.org/~esr/faqs/smart-questions.html

    RHCE for RHEL version 5
    RHCT for RHEL version 4

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    Quote Originally Posted by meton_magis View Post
    Here you can find media downloads for windows 7.
    Windows 7 Direct Download Links

    These are 100% legal as they are just for the iso images, and do not contain the software for pirating the activation keys. Microsoft includes a 30 day grace period where you can run windows 7 without purchasing a license. If all you're doing is flashing your BIOS, you can get a disk from that link, install it (this will wipe out your linux install,) and flash your bios. Then you can re-install linux. It's a pain in the behind, but I've had to use that method to perform similar functions in the past.
    Thanks. I'll try that source for the Win 7. I downloaded a copy from that digital river media supposed to be an authorized source, but the burn fails everytime at 98% and it's a new burner with less than 25 burns. Not having any other problems with it. Probably a funky download or something. Thanks

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    Quote Originally Posted by Levi88 View Post
    Thanks. I'll try that source for the Win 7. I downloaded a copy from that digital river media supposed to be an authorized source, but the burn fails everytime at 98% and it's a new burner with less than 25 burns. Not having any other problems with it. Probably a funky download or something. Thanks
    I couldn't tell you what's going on with your burner, perhaps try burning at a slower speed, I usually do as slow as possible. Though what I can tell you is that it's extremely unlikely that the OEM BIOS provider is distributing a version of the BIOS that allows OC'ing. You find features involved with OC'ing on enthusiast mobos, not daily use OEM computers.

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    Quote Originally Posted by Syndacate View Post
    I couldn't tell you what's going on with your burner, perhaps try burning at a slower speed, I usually do as slow as possible. Though what I can tell you is that it's extremely unlikely that the OEM BIOS provider is distributing a version of the BIOS that allows OC'ing. You find features involved with OC'ing on enthusiast mobos, not daily use OEM computers.

    Ok. Thanks for the advice and knowledge. I was wanting the bios updates for other reasons too

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