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Your DVD is 64bit, but you are trying to fix a 32bit system. Find/download/burn a 32bit version of any Linux distro - it does not have to be RH. DO ...
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  1. #11
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    Your DVD is 64bit, but you are trying to fix a 32bit system. Find/download/burn a 32bit version of any Linux distro - it does not have to be RH.

    DO NOT use single user mode from the hard drive - that will mount the drive that you are trying to fix. In order for the fsck to work, you must boot from external media (CD/DVD/USB).
    Rubberman likes this.

  2. #12
    Linux Guru Rubberman's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by ThomasMcA View Post
    Your DVD is 64bit, but you are trying to fix a 32bit system. Find/download/burn a 32bit version of any Linux distro - it does not have to be RH.

    DO NOT use single user mode from the hard drive - that will mount the drive that you are trying to fix. In order for the fsck to work, you must boot from external media (CD/DVD/USB).
    Clear, concise, and correct. Good post.
    Sometimes, real fast is almost as good as real time.
    Just remember, Semper Gumbi - always be flexible!

  3. #13
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    Yes I did that, and when I typed linux resuce at the

    Code:
    boot :
    prompt, it finally reaches rescue mode prompt, and I type

    Code:
    # cat /etc/fstab
    it cannot detect. It says /etc/fstab not found.

    also, when I type

    Code:
    # df -h
    it does not list all the directories/partitions that I have listed in the last posts. it lists some other partition which I had never come across of before for this machine.

    Why is this and if so how do I umount the partitions when it is not even listed?
    Last edited by anaigini45; 04-26-2013 at 10:25 AM.

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  5. #14
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    You don't need rescue mode. Just boot from the LiveDVD into its normal "Live" mode. You will know you did that correctly when you get to a desktop. From that desktop, open a console, and run your commands from there.

  6. #15
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    Does this mean that the Live CD/DVD is different from the normal ISO DVD installers?
    If I boot from the normal ISO DVD installer, it will get me to the screen where there is option to :

    a) Install or Upgrade in Graphical mode
    b) Install or Upgrade in text mode
    c) etc etc

    So do I choose the Upgrade option for in a) or b)?

  7. #16
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    @anaigini45

    Always umount the device
    example:

    umount /dev/hda1
    umount /dev/

    this is just for temporary. If you reboot the machine, it will show you the mounted again.
    For permenent umount you can remove the entries from /etc/fstab file

    and save the changes.

    Regarding your last reply, i will suggest to go with graphical mode as this will show you how the partitions and size is allowcated.

  8. #17
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    As I listed earlier, this is what the output is when I type a df -h :

    Filesystem Size Used Avail Use% Mounted on
    /dev/hda1 15G 12G 2.4G 84% /
    none 252M 0G 252M 0% /dev/shm
    /dev/hdb 76G 55G 18G 76% /LOCAL2
    /dev/hda2 15G 9.0G 4.8G 66% /LOCAL

    I managed to perform a file system check on /dev/hda2 by unmounting /LOCAL. However, when I try to unmount /LOCAL2, it still shows in the table above after an unmount.
    But when I perform the unmount command again to confirm, it says /LOCAL2 already unmounted. But why does it still show in the table above if the filesystem is already unmounted?

    Also, is it possible to unmount the / partition?

    And what is the none filesystem for? Do I have to perform a umount /dev/shm to check this also?

    This is the result of fdisk -l :

    Disk /dev/hda: 40-.0 GB, 400000000000 bytes
    255 heads, 63 sectors/track, 4863 cylinders
    Units = cylinders of 16065 * 512 = 8225280 bytes

    Device Boot Start End Blocks Id System
    /dev/hda1 * Linux
    /dev/hda2 Linux
    /dev/hda3 Linux swap
    /dev/hda4 Extended
    /dev/hda5 Linux LVM

    Disk /dev/hdb: 82.3 GB, 82348277760 bytes
    255 heads, 63 sectors/track, 10011 cylinders
    Units = cylinders of 16065 * 512 = 8225280 bytes

    Disk /dev/hdb doesn't contain a valid partition table

    My question for the fdisk section is, why are /dev/hda3, /dev/hda4, /dev/hda5 not listed in the output of df -h?
    And why is /dev/hdb listed when it says /dev/hdb does not contain a valid partition table?

  9. #18
    Linux Guru Rubberman's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by anaigini45 View Post
    Does this mean that the Live CD/DVD is different from the normal ISO DVD installers?
    If I boot from the normal ISO DVD installer, it will get me to the screen where there is option to :

    a) Install or Upgrade in Graphical mode
    b) Install or Upgrade in text mode
    c) etc etc

    So do I choose the Upgrade option for in a) or b)?
    You can boot from a Live CD/DVD into a running system without the need to install it. The installation DVD's only allow you to install the system. With a Live DVD, much like a rescue one, you can use various system management tools to fix the problems you may have with the actual system, such as running fsck, fdisk, mounting file systems, editing configuration files, etc.
    Sometimes, real fast is almost as good as real time.
    Just remember, Semper Gumbi - always be flexible!

  10. #19
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    Thanks,

    However, since Red Hat does not provide any free download of live cd/dvd, is it ok to use a Fedora/CentOS live cd instead?

  11. #20
    Linux Guru Rubberman's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by anaigini45 View Post
    Thanks,

    However, since Red Hat does not provide any free download of live cd/dvd, is it ok to use a Fedora/CentOS live cd instead?
    I think RH did used to provide one (a live CD/DVD), on an eval license basis; however, CentOS, Scientific Linux (both free), or Oracle Linux will work just as well as they are "clones" of RHEL. Oracle has added some extra cruft and also have a support license structure, but CentOS and SL are both FOSS (free and open source) clones of RHEL. I have used CentOS in the past, but use SL now, as well as RHEL at work. No difference, other than that CentOS and SL may lag behind RHEL a bit on major version updates in order to fix up the graphics and other copyright cruft.
    Sometimes, real fast is almost as good as real time.
    Just remember, Semper Gumbi - always be flexible!

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