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RE: 'I upgraded to F18 a few weeks ago' Actually you upgraded your laptop from what? If it were from F17 - rough mistake. You could hardly find anything better ...
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  1. #11
    Linux Newbie user-f11's Avatar
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    RE: 'I upgraded to F18 a few weeks ago'
    Actually you upgraded your laptop from what?
    If it were from F17 - rough mistake. You could hardly find anything better than that ... for now.
    If it were from F15 or F16, maybe you should have upgraded to F17.
    You may try to install the i686 F17 Gnome 3.
    If Gnome 3 version makes problems on the laptop, install i686 F17 LXDE, and from the repo list upgrade your desktop graphics to Gnome 3 or KDE or whatever you have been used to.
    You see there are some cases in which 19 is not always better than 17 (depending on the definition of 'better').
    Thus for example Win2000 was not better than Win98SE, Vista was not better than XP, and F18 is definitely not better than F17. In the software engineering the digits in the name of the distro should be read very carefully.
    Last edited by user-f11; 06-19-2013 at 06:32 AM. Reason: spelling

  2. #12
    Penguin of trust elija's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by tmort View Post
    The thread is confusing. So I should write a script with:


    #!/bin/sh
    mount / -orw,remount
    dmesg > /dmesg.shutdown
    mount / -oro,remount

    (script called dmesg_on_shutdown)and booted with kernel options systemd.log_level=debug and systemd.log_target=kmsI then booted with the same options and did

    Shut down and reboot with options:

    sleep 10; /lib/systemd/system-shutdown/dmesg_on_shutdown &
    sync
    halt
    unmounted /dev/hugepages?
    As I understand it:

    Create a file in the folder /lib/systemd/system-shutdown/ called dmesg_on_shutdown and put the following in it
    Code:
    #!/bin/sh
    mount / -orw,remount
    dmesg > /dmesg.shutdown
    mount / -oro,remount
    Make the script executable and reboot. Edit the grub menu and add the following the the kernel line
    Code:
    systemd.log_level=debug and systemd.log_target=kmsI
    Once logged in, run the following in the terminal
    Code:
    sleep 10; /lib/systemd/system-shutdown/dmesg_on_shutdown &
    sync
    halt
    This should produce a file in the / called dmesg.shutdown. It is this file that may show what is hanging. Be careful with the script, add a space in the right place in the third line and you will overwrite your / !!
    What do we want?
    Time machines!

    When do we want 'em?
    Doesn't really matter does it!?


    The Fifth Continent

  3. #13
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    I made the changes in grub (quiet and rhgb) and booted to root again.

    I've attached the file dmesg619boot.txt. This is the file created with dmesg. It is one of three files
    Attached Files Attached Files

  4. #14
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    Part one of file two of three - messages.txt - this is a copy of the file /var/logs/messages
    Attached Files Attached Files

  5. #15
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    file 3 of 3 0 org.txt - this is a copy of the file /var/logs/Xorg.0.logh.

    Note, there was only one part to the previous file "messages"
    Attached Files Attached Files

  6. #16
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    1. i could not open your messages.zip attachment

    2. according to your dmseg619boot.txt.zip attachment, you are still not passing the "vga=normal nomodeset" kernel parameters. or at least you didn't when that file was generated.

    3. according to your Xorg log file, you have an error in your xorg.conf file. try regenerating one with this command (run in a terminal as root):

    Code:
    X -configure
    it should generate a test X config file, usually in /root/xorg.conf.new or something like that. then test it like this:
    Code:
    X -config /root/xorg.conf.new
    substitute the proper path to the new config file, if not the one shown. if that config file works for you, then copy it into place:
    Code:
    cp /root/xorg.conf.new /etc/X11/xorg.conf
    if you want, first back up your existing one first (in case it has other edits that you want to keep, etc.):

    Code:
    cp /etc/X11/xorg.conf /etc/X11/xorg.conf.bak
    you can also check for the latest graphics driver, assuming networking is up:
    Code:
    yum --enablerepo=updates install xorg-x11-drv-intel

  7. #17
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    I did X -configure and then did X -config /root/xorg.conf.new. I got a result on the screen that at the end said there was an error. The error report was the Xorg.0.log file. I thought I copied it to a flash drive, but, I guess I didn't.

    I also tried the yum command, but, that didn't work I think because the wifi connection wasn't connected.

    I found some instructions for connecting to wifi through the command line and later tonight I'll try to save the Xorg log file again and also try connecting to the wifi with the command line.

    In the meantime, I made another compressed messages log file. It has the file extension .zip, but, is actually a bzip2 file. I could open it with Winzip.
    Attached Files Attached Files

  8. #18
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    Here is the Xorg.0.log file from earlier today. I've also attached the boot log file.

    I wasn't able to use the command line to connect to the wifi network. When I issued the command:

    ifconfg wlan0 up

    I got a "not ready message"
    Attached Files Attached Files

  9. #19
    Linux Newbie user-f11's Avatar
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    Just asking: What are you doing with Winzip (under F18 ?!)
    If the HD of the laptop is < 200 GB you may try the LXDE version (and install Gnome Desktop in addition, even Gnome 2, if you wish).
    Reading the post one starts wondering whether you want a smart & nimble computer system with failsafe OS, or you want flash hardware with splash software to overshadow the fireworks in town.

  10. #20
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    I have a laptop which I run Linux on. However, right now my Fedora is broken so I took the HD with Linux out and put the one with Windows in.

    I rarely use windows and I really can't wait to get back to Linux. Pretty much any free download or java update will install all sorts of crapware that will install toolbars that hijack your browsers, etc. unless you are very observant. This happens with sites like CNET, Oracle, etc. Not just some off the wall sites.

    As for LXDE, maybe I should try it. I started using Fedora at about version 5 and haven't tried any other flavors. It's been very reliable till now.

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