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It is not proper netiquette to jump in on someone elses' post so I would suggest you start a new thread. I can see two obvious possibilities. You did not ...
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  1. #11
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    It is not proper netiquette to jump in on someone elses' post so I would suggest you start a new thread.
    I can see two obvious possibilities. You did not burn the iso image of Fedora as an image but just copied it as data to the DVD (that won't work).
    You did not explore all the options in the BIOS to set the DVD drive to first boot priority.
    The first option is the most likely. Which burning software did you use and which option did you select?

  2. #12
    Linux Guru Rubberman's Avatar
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    To ugur3D: You can use the blkid command to determine what the UUID's are for your partitions - as in "blkid /dev/sda1 /dev/sda2 /dev/sda3 /dev/sda4". That will list the UUID's for the first four partitions on your system disc.
    Sometimes, real fast is almost as good as real time.
    Just remember, Semper Gumbi - always be flexible!

  3. #13
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    Quote Originally Posted by yancek View Post
    Your Fedora grub.cfg file shows the menuentry pointing to sda3 (set root='hd0,msdos3'). Your fdisk output in the script shows that the root (/) of the Fedora filesystem including the boot files are on sda4 ('hd0,msdos4'). So that would be one reason why it would not boot. All those entries need to changed. It would also be a good idea to check that the UUID entries are correct. The bootinfoscript usually outputs that information but it is not in the results.txt you posted. You should be able to use the Fedora CD, boot it and open a terminal and login as root user and run: blkid. Check the output for sda4 to see if it is the same as the one shown in the grub.cfg file: 0735ed34-ae4b-4294-bca8-f20c9235e6fc

    If it is the same you won't need to make any changes. If sda4 is different, you need to change it to what blkid shows in its output anywhere in the grub.cfg file and reboot to test.
    Since you are using EasyBCD to boot, your entry for EasyBCD needs to be correct. If you have problems booting after making the changes above, post whatever entry you put in the EasyBCD file for Fedora.

    You could also install the Fedora Grub to the mbr and boot with Grub. The problem I see with that is your grub.cfg file is pointing to windows on sda1 which is now your swap partition so that would also need to be changed. Try making the changes to the Fedora menuentry in grub.cfg (hd0,msdos3) needs to be change to (hd0,msdos4) wherever you see it. Try rebooting and see what happens and also verify the correct UUID first.
    the output of blkid was as follow;

    [liveuser@ugur3d ~]$ blkid
    /dev/sr0: UUID="2013-01-09-17-26-38-00" LABEL="Fedora-18-x86_64-Live-Desktop.is" TYPE="iso9660" PTTYPE="dos"
    /dev/loop0: TYPE="squashfs"
    /dev/loop1: TYPE="DM_snapshot_cow"
    /dev/loop2: TYPE="squashfs"
    /dev/loop3: LABEL="_Fedora-18-x86_6" UUID="4e087d83-8d6a-495b-9080-d02954a98e98" TYPE="ext4"
    /dev/loop4: TYPE="DM_snapshot_cow"
    /dev/sda1: UUID="e55e636a-e437-45f9-bdce-dd2914c4a9b3" TYPE="swap"
    /dev/sda2: LABEL="System Reserved" UUID="5C2438EE2438CCB0" TYPE="ntfs"
    /dev/sda3: UUID="E8103BB5103B8998" TYPE="ntfs"
    /dev/sda4: LABEL="_Fedora-17-x86_6" UUID="0735ed34-ae4b-4294-bca8-f20c9235e6fc" TYPE="ext4"
    /dev/mapper/live-rw: LABEL="_Fedora-18-x86_6" UUID="4e087d83-8d6a-495b-9080-d02954a98e98" TYPE="ext4"
    /dev/mapper/live-osimg-min: LABEL="_Fedora-18-x86_6" UUID="4e087d83-8d6a-495b-9080-d02954a98e98" TYPE="ext4"
    [liveuser@ugur3d ~]$

    if im right its the same...

    it may get a stupid quastion but, where is the Grub.cfg files located?
    and do i need to use special programs do edit inside? or can i just use vim? (or vi)

    Edit;
    I wondered, what does Dev, Sda, UUID means?
    I mean... for what does it stand for.
    Last edited by ugur3D; 05-15-2013 at 08:38 PM.

  4. #14
    Linux Guru Rubberman's Avatar
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    These are the mappings of the device names:

    /dev/sr0 - your boot CD/DVD
    /dev/loopN - these are virtual file systems on the DVD that are mounted in the live environment
    /dev/sdaN - these are the physical system disc partitions. sda2 and sda3 are your NT file systems, /dev/sda1 is your Linux swap space, and /dev/sda4 is probably your root/boot file system for Linux. The numbers after /dev/sda are the partition numbers associated with those file systems.
    /dev/mapper/live... - these are also part of your live DVD environment.

    As for your grub config file, for Red Hat / Fedora systems it is /boot/grub/grub.conf, which is usually mapped to /boot/grub/menu.lst. That's for grub1. If you are using grub2, it gets much more complicated... And yes, you can edit it with vim, vi, gedit, etc. Any text editor will do the job.
    Sometimes, real fast is almost as good as real time.
    Just remember, Semper Gumbi - always be flexible!

  5. #15
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    The grub files should be in /boot/grub. I don't use Fedora but there may be a /boot/grub as well as a /boot/grub2 directory and the file you will be looking for is grub.cfg and as indicated above, it is a simple text file and you can edit it with vi. Ignore the warning to not edit. The only problem you will encounter is if you later update grub, you may lose the entry. You can copy a menuentry once you get it to work to the /etc/grub.d /40_custom file. You could then use the grub2-mkconfig command to update. You'll have to google or go to the Fedora forums for the exact command. It's different than the update-grub in the Ubuntus.

    Dev is for device, meaning a physical device such as a hard drive, DVD drive, etc.
    sda refers also to the physical device. It used to be sda for scsi and hda for IDE/ATA drives but with the onset of SATA most all distributions use sda, sdb, etc for any drive.
    UUID: Universally Unique Identifier.l

  6. #16
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    Hi, i just wanted to say, im gonna make a full backup of all my important files, i found a way how to copy those files that was not able to move (permission denied messange)
    i will install on my pc another Fedora os, i will do first a big format, cus i dont realy need it anymore, all the date that i needed are on my laptop.
    After the installing i will install everthing and move those files what i back-uped and place them into my pc.
    And i hope then that everyhing works fine!

    So uhm, i still want to thank you guys who was helping me, i realy appreciate that! this community is realy awsome keep going it!
    Again, thank you very much!

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