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Hi, I know that there would not be much of a difference, but posted this to kindly request some updates from Linux System Admins. I have CentOS 6.4 installed on ...
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  1. #1
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    Use RHEL 5.8 or RHEL 6 Clone to study linux?


    Hi,

    I know that there would not be much of a difference, but posted this to kindly request some updates from Linux System Admins.

    I have CentOS 6.4 installed on my thinkpad. I am comfortable with linux, the terminal, the yum updates, configuring apache etc.

    It appears that RHEL 5.8 is still quite widely used in the server world, so does it mean that its better to learn RHEL 5.8 (or a clone) or I am good with 6.4?

    I am aware that the RHEL servers are managed through CLI, but do you RHEL Admins get to use a Linux Workstation to manage your servers, or do you putty to it from a Windows Laptop/Workstation?

    Does experience with RHEL GUI helps to manage the servers better?

    Apart from the points mentioned above, what else should I learn to get better on linux?

  2. #2
    Super Moderator Roxoff's Avatar
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    My main server is CentOS 5.8. (CentOS is a binary compatible clone of the commercial OS you're using - but it comes without support. Unsurprisingly, I don't miss the paid-for support. But I digress...)

    I also have a couple of lightweight CentOS 6.x servers that run stuff for me. I can report that there aren't that many differences. Perhaps a prettier start-up screen, and there are a few minor changes to the available package sets right at the fringes, and 6.x uses newer versions of stuff. You don't need to learn anything special to flip between the two.

    As it happens, I hardly ever use the command line to do my config - I tend to use the RedHat config tools a lot of the time as it means I can use a pretty graphical interface to stuff. But I don't let it distance me completely from doing stuff 'raw'. There are some things (like apache and samba) which I wouldn't ever use a gui tool for 'cos I really want the level of control you get by editing the config files manually.

    If you want to learn more broader stuff, then try to move into more 'corporate' style environments. Set up user auth with LDAP, configure intranets, DNS, shared file storage, firewalls and such, then you'd be learning skills that are directly relevant to the commercial sector, i.e. they're hire-able skills. If you think you need lots of computers to do this, then don't worry - set up a few virtual machines and network them together, that's a great way to learn.
    Linux user #126863 - see http://linuxcounter.net/

  3. #3
    Linux Guru Rubberman's Avatar
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    There are a number of good RHEL clones, including CentOS, Scientific Linux, and Oracle Linux. We use CentOS 5 and 6 (migrating to 6) at work for our data centers, and I use Scientific Linux 6 at home on both my workstation and laptop (Dell D630). I also run RHEL 6 on a virtual machine on my work Windows 7 system (Lenovo laptop). They are effectively identical except for the boot graphics (splash screens) and logos. I build applications and package RPM files on one and run on all the others without problems of any sort.

    My recommendation for a new learner is to use an RHEL 6.x (6.2 or later) clone such as CentOS - it is free and a current enterprise distribution. There is stuff it can run that a 5.x ( such as Roxoff's 5.8 ) distribution cannot because of outdated applications, libraries, and kernel (2.6.18 vs. 2.6.32).
    Sometimes, real fast is almost as good as real time.
    Just remember, Semper Gumbi - always be flexible!

  4. #4
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    Quote Originally Posted by thinkpadder View Post
    Hi,

    I know that there would not be much of a difference, but posted this to kindly request some updates from Linux System Admins.

    I have CentOS 6.4 installed on my thinkpad. I am comfortable with linux, the terminal, the yum updates, configuring apache etc.

    It appears that RHEL 5.8 is still quite widely used in the server world, so does it mean that its better to learn RHEL 5.8 (or a clone) or I am good with 6.4?

    I am aware that the RHEL servers are managed through CLI, but do you RHEL Admins get to use a Linux Workstation to manage your servers, or do you putty to it from a Windows Laptop/Workstation?

    Does experience with RHEL GUI helps to manage the servers better?

    Apart from the points mentioned above, what else should I learn to get better on linux?
    RHEL 5 is still in widespread use, but many shops are using RHEL 6 as well. Most things are the same between 5 and 6, so learning 6 will put you at no disadvantage; newer software is available for 6, so unless you have a specific reason to use 5, I recommend 6.

    At work, I administer RHEL systems through putty. On vary rare occasion, I will spin up a linux VM in virtual box to connect to remote systems.

    Almost no production systems use the GUI for RHEL. Most servers don't have X installed, so you can't just boot into run level 5. That said, I use Linux as my desktop distro at home almost exclusively.

  5. #5
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    Hi All,

    Thank you very much for taking time to reply.

    I will surely try out SL/CentOS 6.4 and see how it goes from there.

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