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Hi forum I want to do GUI based installation but xclock command is not found. I have checked, I don't have xclock at all by finding it. Code: # xclock ...
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  1. #1
    Just Joined!
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    May 2014
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    Unhappy xclock command not found - Oracle Linux 6.4


    Hi forum

    I want to do GUI based installation but xclock command is not found. I have checked, I don't have xclock at all by finding it.

    Code:
    # xclock
    -bash: xclock: command not found
    If I search x11 I found following:

    Code:
    # find / -name X11
    /usr/lib64/X11
    /usr/share/X11
    /etc/X11
    I don't think Xorg X11 is installed, because I can't see bin path of X11 in my PATH variable.

    So the challenge is to install this package on my box. It does not have internet so I can not run yum command.

    X11 Forwarding is also yes in /etc/ssh/sshd_config.

    Anyone can tell me the RPM UR L to download and install?

    And suggestion what's the way out.

    I am using following distribution.

    Output of /proc/version file:
    Oracle Linux Server release 6.4
    Red Hat Enterprise Linux Server release 6.4 (Santiago)


    Thank you.

  2. #2
    Linux Guru Rubberman's Avatar
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    I can be found either 40 miles west of Chicago, in Chicago, or in a galaxy far, far away.
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    xclock should be in the default /usr/bin path, so if it isn't then it is likely that xorg is not fully/properly installed. Can you logon in text mode? If so, what happens when your run the command "startx"?
    Sometimes, real fast is almost as good as real time.
    Just remember, Semper Gumbi - always be flexible!

  3. #3
    Linux Newbie nihili's Avatar
    Join Date
    Dec 2013
    Posts
    197
    fwiw, on archlinux xclock also is not installed with the xorg-server.
    i get a similar error when trying to startx with the default /etc/X11/xinit/xinitrc.
    do this in a terminal:
    Code:
    cp /etc/X11/xinit/xinitrc $HOME/.xinitrc
    then edit the file to your liking - i.e. make X start some apps, preferably a window manager.
    you can also leave the file empty, then X won't start anything and it will be utterly useless - you just get a black screen, but no errors.

    the obvious next question is:
    what should i put in .xinitrc?
    and that depends very much on your setup, what you have installed, what gui apps you have installed and so on.

    you should get yourself aquainted with Linux (Software) Package Management in general, and the one for your distro in particular!

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