Find the answer to your Linux question:
Results 1 to 7 of 7
hi guys thanx 4 da help earlier. i have installed redhat linux on ma home computer.i didnt have much problems installing it.but after installing it i am facing few problems. ...
Enjoy an ad free experience by logging in. Not a member yet? Register.
  1. #1
    Just Joined!
    Join Date
    Feb 2005
    Posts
    18

    problems after installing red hat linux


    hi guys thanx 4 da help earlier.

    i have installed redhat linux on ma home computer.i didnt have much problems installing it.but after installing it i am facing few problems.

    1. my usb flash drive(kingston data traveler) is not detected by linux.
    wat must i do in a situation like this

    2.even though linux detected my soundcard and was able to play wave files shipped with linux,i didnt hear any sound when i tried to play audio cd's and mp3's( the player shipped with linux seems to play the file but i didnt hear any sound)

    3.Is there a way i can find out how much disk space is left in a linux partition?

    4. Is it possible in linux to access files in FAT32 partitions(im wondering whether i can transfer files saved in linux partition to a windows partition)

    if any one can help me out on this,it is greatly appritiated!
    thx
    nirVaan

  2. #2
    Just Joined!
    Join Date
    Feb 2005
    Location
    New York
    Posts
    17
    im not a pro myself but this might help your USB problem

    http://www.linuxforums.org/tutorials...ial-26510.html

  3. #3
    Linux Enthusiast
    Join Date
    Oct 2004
    Posts
    609

    Re: problems after installing red hat linux

    Quote Originally Posted by nirVaan
    1. my usb flash drive(kingston data traveler) is not detected by linux.
    what must i do in a situation like this
    Sorry, can't help you here.

    Quote Originally Posted by nirVaan
    2.even though linux detected my soundcard and was able to play wave files shipped with linux,i didnt hear any sound when i tried to play audio cd's and mp3's( the player shipped with linux seems to play the file but i didnt hear any sound)
    Xmms is by default not capable to play mp3 files (because of a legal issue, the mp3 alogarithm isn't free/open-source). You might want to remove the Xmms supplied by Redhat (or Fedora?) and download it from the Xmms site. As far as your cd's are concerned, check to see if the audio-cable is connected between the cdromplayer and the soundcard AND that the volume isn't on mute!

    Quote Originally Posted by nirVaan
    3.Is there a way i can find out how much disk space is left in a linux partition?
    Code:
    $ df
    This will give you all the information on each partion on your system.

    Quote Originally Posted by nirVaan
    4. Is it possible in linux to access files in FAT32 partitions(im wondering whether i can transfer files saved in linux partition to a windows partition)
    You can access files from a Fat32 partition when using Linux, but you can't do it vise-versa from Windows (naughty Bill Gates).

  4. $spacer_open
    $spacer_close
  5. #4
    Just Joined!
    Join Date
    Feb 2005
    Posts
    18

    Some answers and more questions abt ma earlier post

    thanx guys for all da info

    i was searching the web trying find a solution 4 ma usb prob and i came across a nice article which i hope will help lot of newbie's like me.

    so hear goes

    Getting Started

    To start off, you'll need to be logged in as root to set this up and to set permissions.

    Verify that you have the needed kernel modules loaded. To find out what modules you have loaded, open a terminal window and type the following:

    lsmod | more

    The output of lsmod will look like this:


    Module Size Used by Not tainted
    nls_cp437 5116 0 (autoclean)
    vfat 13004 0 (autoclean)
    fat 38808 0 (autoclean) [vfat]
    nls_iso8859-1 3516 0 (autoclean)
    udf 98400 0 (autoclean)
    ide-scsi 12208 0
    soundcore 6404 6 (autoclean) [snd]
    sd_mod 13516 0 (autoclean)
    lp 8996 0 (autoclean)
    parport 37056 0 (autoclean) [lp]
    autofs 13268 0 (autoclean) (unused)
    e100 60644 1
    ipt_REJECT 3928 6 (autoclean)
    iptable_filter 2412 1 (autoclean)
    ip_tables 15096 2 [ipt_REJECT iptable_filter]
    sg 36524 0 (autoclean)
    sr_mod 18136 0 (autoclean)
    scsi_mod 107160 4 [ide-scsi sd_mod sg sr_mod]
    ide-cd 35708 0
    cdrom 33728 0 [sr_mod ide-cd]
    keybdev 2944 0 (unused)
    mousedev 5492 1
    hid 22148 0 (unused)
    input 5856 0 [keybdev mousedev hid]
    usb-uhci 26348 0 (unused)
    usbcore 78784 1 [hid usb-uhci]
    ext3 70784 2
    jbd 51892 2 [ext3]

    By default, Red Hat loads usb-uhci and usbcore on startup. But you'll need to load an additional module called usb-storage in order to get a flash drive working. To do this, simply type:

    modprobe usb-storage

    Next, we'll need to define a mount point for the USB flash drive, which includes a directory for the mount point. So go to the /mnt sub-directory and create this sub-directory.

    cd /mnt
    mkdir /usbstick

    Now we need to edit a file called fstab, which lives in the /etc directory. This file defines storage devices and the location of their mount-points.

    Open the file using gedit, emacs or your text editor of choice. Its contents will look like this:


    LABEL=/ / ext3 defaults 1 1
    LABEL=/boot /boot ext3 defaults 1 2
    none /dev/pts devpts gid=5,mode=620 0 0
    none /proc proc defaults 0 0
    none /dev/shm tmpfs defaults 0 0
    /dev/hda3 swap swap defaults 0 0
    /dev/cdrom /mnt/cdrom udf,iso9660 noauto,owner,kudzu,ro 0 0
    /dev/fd0 /mnt/floppy auto noauto,owner,kudzu 0 0

    We need to add a line to this file that reads:

    /dev/sda1 /mnt/usbstick vfat user,noauto,umask=0 0 0

    You can copy/paste the above line directly into your fstab file.

    The "sda1" represents the device name that the kernel gives the USB flash drive when it gets plugged in.

    Once you've added this line to the fstab file, save it and close your text editor.

    Now we're almost ready to plug in your USB flash drive. Open a second terminal window and type:

    tail -s 3 -f /var/log/messages

    This command will poll the kernel's message log every three seconds, and displays the latest messages the kernel has spat out. This is a useful debug tool to make sure the USB flash drive has been enumerated, and assigned a device name. Generally, the device name will be:

    /dev/sda1

    Now, go ahead and plug your flash drive into the USB port.

    Up and Running

    Once you've plugged the drive in, look at the terminal window where you're monitoring the kernel's event messages and verify that it has enumerated the USB device. You should see something like this:

    Aug 26 17:06:09 localhost kernel: hub.c: new USB device 00:1f.2-1, assigned address 4
    Aug 26 17:06:13 localhost /etc/hotplug/usb.agent: Setup usb-storage for USB product d7d/100/100
    Aug 26 17:06:13 localhost /etc/hotplug/usb.agent: Setup nomadjukebox for USB product d7d/100/100
    Aug 26 17:06:13 localhost /etc/hotplug/usb.agent: Module setup nomadjukebox for USB product d7d/100/100
    Aug 26 17:06:13 localhost kernel: SCSI device sda: 121856 512-byte hdwr sectors (62 MB) Aug 26 17:06:13 localhost kernel: sda: Write Protect is off
    Aug 26 17:06:13 localhost kernel: sda: sda1 Aug 26 17:06:13 localhost devlabel: devlabel service started/restarted

    The key event here is that the device was assigned as /dev/sda1. You can now mount the volume by typing:

    cd /mnt
    mount usbstick

    If all has gone well, a disk icon will appear on your KDE/Gnome desktop and double-clicking on it will open a window that reveals the contents of your USB flash drive.

    There's also a way to automate this process, where you can mount your USB flash drive without having to type anything at a command line. In Gnome, when you right-click anywhere on the desktop, one of the menu choices you have is Scripts, which is a quick and easy way to execute Bash scripts without having to open a terminal window. By default, there are no scripts in the folder that this menu points to, but there is an option to open that folder. Once in the folder, create a new text file and open it in your favorite text editor (we use gedit) to write the following script.

    You can simply copy/paste what we have here into your Bash script:

    #!/bin/bash

    modprobe usb-storage
    cd /mnt
    mount usbstick

    We run the modprobe command just to make sure that the usb-storage module is loaded. If it's already loaded, there's no harm done, and if it wasn't already loaded, now it is.

    Now save the script as something like mount usbstick, and copy it into the /root/.gnome2/nautilus-scripts sub-directory.

    From Gnome/KDE, right-click on this script and go to the Permissions tab dialog. Set the script as executable by the appropriate groups/users, and click OK.

    You'll want this script to be available to non-root users, so be sure to copy it to their respective sub-directories:

    /home/username/.gnome2/nautilus-scripts

    Now when you right-click on the desktop and go down to the Scripts menu choice, in the Scripts sub-menu you should see your mount usbstick script.

    If you have your USB flash drive mounted as a volume, right-click on it, and the bottom menu choice should be Unmount Volume. Go ahead and unmount the volume and physically remove the USB flash drive.

    Now go ahead and re-insert the flash drive into an available USB port. Next, right-click on the desktop, go into the Scripts sub-menu and execute your mount usbstick script. The drive icon for your flash drive should appear on your desktop, and you're ready to pull bits off of it or write bits to it to carry home.

    hope this will help .

    and abt ma other problem "accessing linux partition in windows", i think its possible if you have "partition magic 8" with you.you can use the browse partition option to access the linux partition and then you can copy wat ever files you want and save it in a windows partition.

    **and if it is possible can any one tell me how i can access a windows partition in linux so i can save files in that partiton to be used in windows later.

    thx

  6. #5
    Just Joined!
    Join Date
    Nov 2004
    Posts
    1

    Accessing windows partition

    You can access a windows partition like you do for a linux partition. Make sure it is a FAT 32 partition. B'cas by default Linux supports only FAT 32 partition. For NTFS support you need to recompile the kernel.
    To see the windows partiton you can type

    # fdisk -l
    note down the windows partition,

    Eg. if its /dev/hda3

    try doing this

    # mount /dev/hda3 /mnt/win

    Now you can access the windows partition

    Suresh

  7. #6
    Linux Enthusiast
    Join Date
    Jun 2004
    Location
    Windsor, CO
    Posts
    656
    Technically, you can get NTFS support for Fedora/Redhat by a kernel module RPM (unless you already recompiled the kernel), but it's the old (unsafe) version, so you should just recompile it.
    Keep in mind though, even if you recompile the kernel, you'll still get read-only support. It HAS write support, but for all practical purposes, the write-support is so limited as to be useless.
    Emotions are the key to the soul.
    Registered Linux User #375050

  8. #7
    Just Joined!
    Join Date
    Jun 2006
    Posts
    74
    Quote Originally Posted by nirVaan
    thanx guys for all da info

    i was searching the web trying find a solution 4 ma usb prob and i came across a nice article which i hope will help lot of newbie's like me.

    so hear goes

    Getting Started

    To start off, you'll need to be logged in as root to set this up and to set permissions.

    Verify that you have the needed kernel modules loaded. To find out what modules you have loaded, open a terminal window and type the following:

    lsmod | more

    The output of lsmod will look like this:


    Module Size Used by Not tainted
    nls_cp437 5116 0 (autoclean)
    vfat 13004 0 (autoclean)
    fat 38808 0 (autoclean) [vfat]
    nls_iso8859-1 3516 0 (autoclean)
    udf 98400 0 (autoclean)
    ide-scsi 12208 0
    soundcore 6404 6 (autoclean) [snd]
    sd_mod 13516 0 (autoclean)
    lp 8996 0 (autoclean)
    parport 37056 0 (autoclean) [lp]
    autofs 13268 0 (autoclean) (unused)
    e100 60644 1
    ipt_REJECT 3928 6 (autoclean)
    iptable_filter 2412 1 (autoclean)
    ip_tables 15096 2 [ipt_REJECT iptable_filter]
    sg 36524 0 (autoclean)
    sr_mod 18136 0 (autoclean)
    scsi_mod 107160 4 [ide-scsi sd_mod sg sr_mod]
    ide-cd 35708 0
    cdrom 33728 0 [sr_mod ide-cd]
    keybdev 2944 0 (unused)
    mousedev 5492 1
    hid 22148 0 (unused)
    input 5856 0 [keybdev mousedev hid]
    usb-uhci 26348 0 (unused)
    usbcore 78784 1 [hid usb-uhci]
    ext3 70784 2
    jbd 51892 2 [ext3]

    By default, Red Hat loads usb-uhci and usbcore on startup. But you'll need to load an additional module called usb-storage in order to get a flash drive working. To do this, simply type:

    modprobe usb-storage

    Next, we'll need to define a mount point for the USB flash drive, which includes a directory for the mount point. So go to the /mnt sub-directory and create this sub-directory.

    cd /mnt
    mkdir /usbstick

    Now we need to edit a file called fstab, which lives in the /etc directory. This file defines storage devices and the location of their mount-points.

    Open the file using gedit, emacs or your text editor of choice. Its contents will look like this:


    LABEL=/ / ext3 defaults 1 1
    LABEL=/boot /boot ext3 defaults 1 2
    none /dev/pts devpts gid=5,mode=620 0 0
    none /proc proc defaults 0 0
    none /dev/shm tmpfs defaults 0 0
    /dev/hda3 swap swap defaults 0 0
    /dev/cdrom /mnt/cdrom udf,iso9660 noauto,owner,kudzu,ro 0 0
    /dev/fd0 /mnt/floppy auto noauto,owner,kudzu 0 0

    We need to add a line to this file that reads:

    /dev/sda1 /mnt/usbstick vfat user,noauto,umask=0 0 0

    You can copy/paste the above line directly into your fstab file.

    The "sda1" represents the device name that the kernel gives the USB flash drive when it gets plugged in.

    Once you've added this line to the fstab file, save it and close your text editor.

    Now we're almost ready to plug in your USB flash drive. Open a second terminal window and type:

    tail -s 3 -f /var/log/messages

    This command will poll the kernel's message log every three seconds, and displays the latest messages the kernel has spat out. This is a useful debug tool to make sure the USB flash drive has been enumerated, and assigned a device name. Generally, the device name will be:

    /dev/sda1

    Now, go ahead and plug your flash drive into the USB port.

    Up and Running

    Once you've plugged the drive in, look at the terminal window where you're monitoring the kernel's event messages and verify that it has enumerated the USB device. You should see something like this:

    Aug 26 17:06:09 localhost kernel: hub.c: new USB device 00:1f.2-1, assigned address 4
    Aug 26 17:06:13 localhost /etc/hotplug/usb.agent: Setup usb-storage for USB product d7d/100/100
    Aug 26 17:06:13 localhost /etc/hotplug/usb.agent: Setup nomadjukebox for USB product d7d/100/100
    Aug 26 17:06:13 localhost /etc/hotplug/usb.agent: Module setup nomadjukebox for USB product d7d/100/100
    Aug 26 17:06:13 localhost kernel: SCSI device sda: 121856 512-byte hdwr sectors (62 MB) Aug 26 17:06:13 localhost kernel: sda: Write Protect is off
    Aug 26 17:06:13 localhost kernel: sda: sda1 Aug 26 17:06:13 localhost devlabel: devlabel service started/restarted

    The key event here is that the device was assigned as /dev/sda1. You can now mount the volume by typing:

    cd /mnt
    mount usbstick

    If all has gone well, a disk icon will appear on your KDE/Gnome desktop and double-clicking on it will open a window that reveals the contents of your USB flash drive.

    There's also a way to automate this process, where you can mount your USB flash drive without having to type anything at a command line. In Gnome, when you right-click anywhere on the desktop, one of the menu choices you have is Scripts, which is a quick and easy way to execute Bash scripts without having to open a terminal window. By default, there are no scripts in the folder that this menu points to, but there is an option to open that folder. Once in the folder, create a new text file and open it in your favorite text editor (we use gedit) to write the following script.

    You can simply copy/paste what we have here into your Bash script:

    #!/bin/bash

    modprobe usb-storage
    cd /mnt
    mount usbstick

    We run the modprobe command just to make sure that the usb-storage module is loaded. If it's already loaded, there's no harm done, and if it wasn't already loaded, now it is.

    Now save the script as something like mount usbstick, and copy it into the /root/.gnome2/nautilus-scripts sub-directory.

    From Gnome/KDE, right-click on this script and go to the Permissions tab dialog. Set the script as executable by the appropriate groups/users, and click OK.

    You'll want this script to be available to non-root users, so be sure to copy it to their respective sub-directories:

    /home/username/.gnome2/nautilus-scripts

    Now when you right-click on the desktop and go down to the Scripts menu choice, in the Scripts sub-menu you should see your mount usbstick script.

    If you have your USB flash drive mounted as a volume, right-click on it, and the bottom menu choice should be Unmount Volume. Go ahead and unmount the volume and physically remove the USB flash drive.

    Now go ahead and re-insert the flash drive into an available USB port. Next, right-click on the desktop, go into the Scripts sub-menu and execute your mount usbstick script. The drive icon for your flash drive should appear on your desktop, and you're ready to pull bits off of it or write bits to it to carry home.

    hope this will help .

    and abt ma other problem "accessing linux partition in windows", i think its possible if you have "partition magic 8" with you.you can use the browse partition option to access the linux partition and then you can copy wat ever files you want and save it in a windows partition.

    **and if it is possible can any one tell me how i can access a windows partition in linux so i can save files in that partiton to be used in windows later.

    thx
    Dear Nirvaan,

    Thanks for the pretty info man, this help is really useful for any user, i have try this way and it has shown me the data immediately, and i m so happy, that i ve got success from so many efforts.

    Thanks,
    Nishant

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •