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  1. #1

    New to Red Hat - a couple of questions


    I installed Red Hat 7.3 and installation went fine. I have a couple of questions though.
    The first has to do with sound. When I test the sound, it works fine, but if I play an audio cd or other sound, it doesn't work.

    My other problems is more important, however. I have three hard drives connected to the computer. When I use the hardware browser, they display fine. However, I can't seem to access them any other way. I tons of mp3's and pictures on one of the drives but when I open the sound or video programs that came with Red Hat, I can't seem to find a way to see and browse these hard drives. I'm sure it is something completely retarded that I am missing but if anyone could offer some advice, it would be much appreciated.
    Thanks

  2. #2
    Are those other drives formatted as NTFS by any chance?
    There are two major products that come out of Berkeley: LSD and UNIX. We don't believe this to be a coincidence.

    - Jeremy S. Anderson

  3. #3
    Linux Guru techieMoe's Avatar
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    Re: New to Red Hat - a couple of questions

    Quote Originally Posted by Sematary
    I installed Red Hat 7.3 and installation went fine. I have a couple of questions though.
    The first has to do with sound. When I test the sound, it works fine, but if I play an audio cd or other sound, it doesn't work.
    You're saying only the sound test plays anything and no other sound file on your system plays? Are you sure it's not a problem confined to your CD-ROM drive? There's a possibility that something is blocking your sound device. What desktop are you using? (Gnome, KDE, etc) Is there a reason you picked version 7.3?
    Registered Linux user #270181

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  5. #4
    Quote Originally Posted by Flatline
    Are those other drives formatted as NTFS by any chance?
    One of them is and one is fat32. Supposedly they are under /dev as /dev/hdb and /dev/hdd respectively but when I look in the /dev directory I don't see them.

  6. #5

    Re: New to Red Hat - a couple of questions

    Quote Originally Posted by techieMoe
    Quote Originally Posted by Sematary
    I installed Red Hat 7.3 and installation went fine. I have a couple of questions though.
    The first has to do with sound. When I test the sound, it works fine, but if I play an audio cd or other sound, it doesn't work.
    You're saying only the sound test plays anything and no other sound file on your system plays? Are you sure it's not a problem confined to your CD-ROM drive? There's a possibility that something is blocking your sound device. What desktop are you using? (Gnome, KDE, etc) Is there a reason you picked version 7.3?
    Yes, only the sound test plays. I tried playing a .wav file that I ripped from the cd but that didn't work either. I am using Gnome (and wondering how to get to a command prompt). I chose version 7.3 because it was a relatively small install and the installation disk (hd) is only about 4 gigs. I am mostly testing the OS out at this point and am completely unfamiliar with the OS. I like it though. Very clean and fast.

  7. #6
    RedHat doesn't come with NTFS support "out of the box". You have to fiddle with it a bit (more on that later). You would need to mount the drives to see them. Create a directory for the FAT32 drive, for example:
    Code:
    mkdir /mnt/win
    Then you can mount the drive:
    Code:
    mount /dev/hdd /mnt/win
    You may have to specify the filesystem type for the mount command to work (I'm not sure about 7.3 in that regard). If it asks, then use this command:
    Code:
    mount -t vfat /dev/hdd /mnt/win
    To get NTFS support working, you'll need to install an RPM and follow some steps. You can find the RPMs and instructions here: http://linux-ntfs.sourceforge.net/rpm/redhat7.html
    There are two major products that come out of Berkeley: LSD and UNIX. We don't believe this to be a coincidence.

    - Jeremy S. Anderson

  8. #7
    Quote Originally Posted by Flatline
    RedHat doesn't come with NTFS support "out of the box". You have to fiddle with it a bit (more on that later). You would need to mount the drives to see them. Create a directory for the FAT32 drive, for example:
    Code:
    mkdir /mnt/win
    Then you can mount the drive:
    Code:
    mount /dev/hdd /mnt/win
    You may have to specify the filesystem type for the mount command to work (I'm not sure about 7.3 in that regard). If it asks, then use this command:
    Code:
    mount -t vfat /dev/hdd /mnt/win
    To get NTFS support working, you'll need to install an RPM and follow some steps. You can find the RPMs and instructions here: http://linux-ntfs.sourceforge.net/rpm/redhat7.html
    Thanks for the help. I'm taking a look at that rpm thing right now. So much to learn.

  9. #8
    Linux Guru techieMoe's Avatar
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    Re: New to Red Hat - a couple of questions

    Quote Originally Posted by Sematary
    Yes, only the sound test plays. I tried playing a .wav file that I ripped from the cd but that didn't work either. I am using Gnome (and wondering how to get to a command prompt).
    There should be a link to a program under your "System" (I think) menu for GTerm. You could also pull up a "Run..." dialog and type in xterm. That will give you a command prompt.

    Do any of your system sounds play?

    I chose version 7.3 because it was a relatively small install and the installation disk (hd) is only about 4 gigs. I am mostly testing the OS out at this point and am completely unfamiliar with the OS. I like it though. Very clean and fast.
    If you're especially brave and want to learn an awful lot about Linux, you might consider looking at Gentoo. It takes a very long time to get installed, but it's very clean will only install what you tell it to.

    I only asked why 7.3 because it's over 3 years old right now, and in terms Linux, that's ancient. You might have better luck with your hardware using a newer distro. Of course, you'll have to choose carefully with a 4GB harddrive.
    Registered Linux user #270181

  10. #9
    Of course, you'll have to choose carefully with a 4GB harddrive.
    It's not THAT bad...my Suse install is around 3 Gb with all the bells and whistles...of course, he'll still need a swap partition, etc., but he could probably do a "slightly slimmer" install of one of the big distros and be OK - he just wouldn't have a whole lot of "wiggle room".
    There are two major products that come out of Berkeley: LSD and UNIX. We don't believe this to be a coincidence.

    - Jeremy S. Anderson

  11. #10
    Quote Originally Posted by Flatline
    Of course, you'll have to choose carefully with a 4GB harddrive.
    It's not THAT bad...my Suse install is around 3 Gb with all the bells and whistles...of course, he'll still need a swap partition, etc., but he could probably do a "slightly slimmer" install of one of the big distros and be OK - he just wouldn't have a whole lot of "wiggle room".
    I'll probably be better off searching around for a 20 gig hard drive and getting newer version of Red Hat or some other distro. The 4 gig hd was just something I had laying around and as I'm getting into a networking degree I felt I should learn linux as many companies use that.
    I ran the cat /proc/filesystems command and ntfs didn't show up so I suppose I'll need one of those ntfs rpm's for the time being. Now if I could just figure out what is up with the sound.

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