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hey, im a newbie to linux, does ext3 need defragmenting, or does it do it automaticly, or what.....
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  1. #1
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    ext3 defragging?


    hey, im a newbie to linux, does ext3 need defragmenting, or does it do it automaticly, or what..

  2. #2
    Linux Newbie rat007's Avatar
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    There's no need to defragment ext3 disk. This is not NTFS or stupid FAT.

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    so, on ext3, when you delete files, is there free space left between files on the filesystem, and if a new file is introduced, could it be spread out, i just dont understand how it all organises the files, and stops a single file from bein spread over the disc, rather than in one spot
    would anyone be able to explain it

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    Linux Guru budman7's Avatar
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    Ext3 uses a journaled file system.
    The way I understood it, when you save a file, it is stored in a certain place in an appropriate folder.
    Not just in the next empty space on the hard drive.
    So when you delete a file, that folder gets rearranged automatically, so there is no big empty spot in the middle of the folder.
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    Re:

    Sounds like you are trying to merge hardware logic with software. Can't do that. The disk hardware works on a totally different level.

  6. #6
    Linux Guru budman7's Avatar
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    That is the way I learned it.
    When you save a file in Windows, it is saved on the hard drive, and if there is not enough space there to hold the file, it puts more of the file into the next empoty spot, and if there is more, well you get the idea.
    That is why you need to keep defragging your hard drive.
    Ext3 doesn't separate files, so no fragmentation occurs.

    So to merge software logic with hardware logic is essential to understand the filesystems.
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    Re:

    ahha..Then you must also start to understand inodes & their functions. Then you will need to understand magnetic fragmentation of a hard disk. ??

  8. #8
    Linux User eugrus's Avatar
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    You can use
    Code:
    e2defrag
    util to defragment your ext2 FS.

    But you should have a very active long use of it to get a real need of that.

  9. #9
    Linux Guru budman7's Avatar
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    This page might explain it a little better
    http://wiki.arslinux.com/About_Defragmentation
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    ok thanks, i understand it now

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