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A12ctic, may I ask what card your using? Using an NVidia 6800 GT here... or could this be a global issue across the nvidia platform of drivers? Any suggestions from ...
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  1. #11
    Just Joined!
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    May 2005
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    resolution


    A12ctic, may I ask what card your using? Using an NVidia 6800 GT here... or could this be a global issue across the nvidia platform of drivers? Any suggestions from you pros out there?

  2. #12
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    bump

    /bump

  3. #13
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    Quote Originally Posted by jimbaloo
    Go to Nvidia's website, navigate to the drivers. Check that your card is supported by the available linux drivers, you can find a list on the driver archive page. Download the newest drivers, remember where you put them. Read the installation instructions, print them out so that you have them handy, you will probably need them.
    Log in as root. type in
    Code:
    # gedit /etc/inittab
    Find the following section in the file that you have opened:
    # Default runlevel. The runlevels used by RHS are:
    # 0 - halt (Do NOT set initdefault to this)
    # 1 - Single user mode
    # 2 - Multiuser, without NFS (The same as 3, if you do not have networking)
    # 3 - Full multiuser mode
    # 4 - unused
    # 5 - X11
    # 6 - reboot (Do NOT set initdefault to this)
    #
    id:5:initdefault:
    Change the last line to
    id:3:initdefault:
    This will set the default runlevel to 3, which is text. This will boot into text mode the next time you start your machine.
    Once in text mode:
    Code:
    sh NVIDIA-Linux-x86-1.0-7174-pkg1.run
    where 1.0-7174 is the version of the driver you have downloaded (if the version you have is different from this you need to change these numbers so they match yours) The installer included with the package takes over from here and walks you through the rest of the installation. Then all you have to do is edit a couple of lines in the xorg.conf file.
    Use vi for this. Type
    Code:
    vi /etc/X11/xorg.conf
    Here you need to edit the device section from Driver = "nv" to Driver "nvidia" Then the module section. Make sure that Load "glx" is included here, and remove Load "dri" and Load "glcore"
    save your changes. open your inttab file with vi and change your runlevel back to 5, and reboot.
    If you have not used vi before you will need to know a couple of simple commands to use it. First, when you have made your changes hit the esc key. Then type
    Code:
    :w
    this saves the changes.
    Code:
    :q
    will then quit the editor.
    If you don't know how to cd into a file you just type
    Code:
    cd /put/full/path/here
    ps. you don't really need to change the default runlevel, but I think it's good to practise editing these files when you have simple work to do, that way if something difficult comes up at least you will be somewhat familiar with the process.
    ok ive tried this but in the middle of the installation it says something about how i need gcc or something to comtunue. what is this?

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  5. #14
    Linux Newbie
    Join Date
    Mar 2005
    Location
    Romania
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    Open a new console (terminal), type
    Code:
    su -l
    enter the root password, then type
    Code:
    yum install gcc
    After the installation is complete follow the steps jimbaloo suggested... it should work now.

    GCC stands for GNU Compiler Collection... if you want to know more about it go here (btw, if you're a programmer you're bound to use it)
    You can only be young once. But you can always be immature.

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