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In that case: Originally Posted by Odd_Bloke In X, run: Code: system-config-securitylevel...
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  1. #11
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    In that case:
    Quote Originally Posted by Odd_Bloke
    In X, run:
    Code:
    system-config-securitylevel
    \"I am, after all,\" said Pooh, \"a bear of very little brain.\"
    MY PC: Athlon XP64 3000+ on a Asus K8V-X mobo w/1GB of non-descript RAM. AGP - GeForce 2 MX400. PCI - Creative Live! 5.1 soundcard. 140 GB and 120 GB SATA WD drives.

  2. #12
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    Quote Originally Posted by zillah
    I have /boot partition.
    ...and...
    Write down, print or copy to floppy your bootloader scripts. And make a Grub boot floppy for security.
    Did you meen the /etc/grub.conf ?
    Yes, that's the file. Different distros handle this differently, but there should in any case, be a grub.conf in the /boot/grub/ directory. As long as you have those "scripts" or the information under each "title" then you will have a chance to load any of your OSs, if not with your normal boot procedure, then with a Grub boot floppy. Since you have a /boot partition, it is easy to avoid changing that during a reinstall: you simply do not mount the /boot partition during the reinstall so that instead all boot files will be written to a /boot/ directory. Choose to have Grub written to the boot record of the root partition. If you do that, then your MBR and your /boot partition will be unchanged and when you boot, you will be able to chainload your FC3 at the Grub command line by entering the following:
    Code:
    grub> root &#40;hdN,N&#41;   <-the root partition with your /boot directory
    grub> chainloader +1
    grub> boot
    At a later time you can edit your grub.conf either to boot as it did before or to chainload as described above.
    /IMHO
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  3. #13
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    Quote Originally Posted by Odd_Bloke
    In that case:
    Quote Originally Posted by Odd_Bloke
    ......
    I think he means that he is unable to get his GUI due to the filesystem corruption issue. I'm not sure that turning off SELinux at this time is an option until he can do a proper boot. But then, there may be a boot parameter or maybe just a config file under init.d?
    /IMHO
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  4. #14
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    Quote Originally Posted by drakebasher
    I think he means that he is unable to get his GUI due to the filesystem corruption issue.
    Man, sometimes I wish I'd learnt how to read in high school...

    I apologise for that.
    \"I am, after all,\" said Pooh, \"a bear of very little brain.\"
    MY PC: Athlon XP64 3000+ on a Asus K8V-X mobo w/1GB of non-descript RAM. AGP - GeForce 2 MX400. PCI - Creative Live! 5.1 soundcard. 140 GB and 120 GB SATA WD drives.

  5. #15
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    Looks like it's just a matter of editing a file:
    Quote Originally Posted by $ man selinux
    The /etc/selinux/config configuration file controls whether SELinux is
    enabled or disabled, and if enabled, whether SELinux operates in per-
    missive mode or enforcing mode. The SELINUX variable may be set to any
    one of disabled, permissive, or enforcing to select one of these
    options. The disabled option completely disables the SELinux kernel
    and application code, leaving the system running without any SELinux
    protection. The permissive option enables the SELinux code, but causes
    it to operate in a mode where accesses that would be denied by policy
    are permitted but audited. The enforcing option enables the SELinux
    code and causes it to enforce access denials as well as auditing them.
    Permissive mode may yield a different set of denials than enforcing
    mode, both because enforcing mode will prevent an operation from pro-
    ceeding past the first denial and because some application code will
    fall back to a less privileged mode of operation if denied access.
    Quote Originally Posted by # cat /etc/selinux/config
    # This file controls the state of SELinux on the system.
    # SELINUX= can take one of these three values:
    # enforcing - SELinux security policy is enforced.
    # permissive - SELinux prints warnings instead of enforcing.
    # disabled - SELinux is fully disabled.
    SELINUX=disabled
    # SELINUXTYPE= type of policy in use. Possible values are:
    # targeted - Only targeted network daemons are protected.
    # strict - Full SELinux protection.
    SELINUXTYPE=targeted
    /IMHO
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  6. #16
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    you simply do not mount the /boot partition during the reinstall so that instead all boot files will be written to a /boot/ directory. Choose to have Grub written to the boot record of the root partition. If you do that, then your MBR and your /boot partition will be unchanged and when you boot,
    I just want to double check with you what I understood from your advice ( correct me if I am wrong).


    1- I have to mount all file systems on thier own directories (my case : /, /usr, /home, swap) except "/boot" file system.




    2- During installatin and reinstallation FC3, I have two options:

    (2/a) UsingGRUB as the boot loader.

    (2/b) Do not install a boot loader.

    Do I need to choose option (2/a) ?



    During installation and reinstallation I will get this option as well (after number 2 above):

    3- Install Boot Loader record on :

    (3/a) /dev/hda Master Boot Record (MBR).

    (3/b) /dev/hda2 First sector of boot partition.---->(in FC3 it first secotr of boot not root, while in Mandrake it is vice versa)

    Do I need to choose option (3/b) ?-----> in order not to overwrite MBR as you advised.

  7. #17
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    You have understood correctly on all points, zillah.

    In item 1.: By not mounting the /boot partition, the FC3 installer will instead write everything for the /boot/ directory directly to the directory on the root partition. So it will write your kernel and initrd as well as the /grub/ subdirectory and all grub files. Later on, you may copy those files to the /boot partition.

    In items 2. and 3.: By memory, I thought that in the screen for selecting the bootloader, that there is a button "Advanced" or similar which was where you would choose where to write the bootloader to. In any case, it is clear that you understand the choices to be made.
    Quote Originally Posted by zillah
    (3/b) /dev/hda2 First sector of boot partition.---->(in FC3 it first secotr of boot not root, while in Mandrake it is vice versa)
    While it may have said "First sector of boot partition." previously, it may say "First sector of root partition." this time since there will not be a separate /boot partition. No matter either way.

    If you reinstall to the same partitions as before, you will probably be able to boot normally, that is: without the need for a new bootloader. But I recommend that you do as we have discussed, to be sure. I've used this method a few times with a couple of distros and it has always worked as described.
    /IMHO
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  8. #18
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    I think he means that he is unable to get his GUI due to the filesystem corruption issue
    Yes this is what I meant.

  9. #19
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    Thanks drakebasher, it is ok now.

    But still I can see the /usr partition which is (my case) /dev/hda6 under "My Computer" windowsOS, named: Local Disk (K : )!!! ?. When I tried to access it, it asked to format the partition, which I have not.
    1- Throught "My Computer" icon (windows OS), I can see (which I should not) the partition that is belong to linux (/usr)!!! but I can not (It should be like this) see the other Linux partitons /, /boot, /home.



    2- When I used (windows OS) the utility called "explore2fs" I was able to see (/, /boot, /home) but not /usr.!!!!
    Now I can see all of them,not only some of them (/, /boot, /home, and /usr1) .-------> Note number 1

    Why it has been named (/usr1) ?.-----> I meant 1





    I checked by using CD1 of FC3 fdisk -l and I found this (see bold color):

    System Id Blocks End Start Boot Device
    HPFS/NTFS 7 1 1275 /dev/hda1
    Linux 83 1276 1339 /dev/hda2
    unknown bf 1340 2164 * /dev/hda3
    W95 Ext'd (LBA)
    f 2165 4864 /dev/hda4
    Partition 3 does not end on cylinder boundary
    W95 FAT32 b 2165 3506 /dev/hda5
    Linux 83 3507 4462 /dev/hda6
    Linux swap 82 4463 4527 /dev/hda7
    Linux 83 4528 4718 /dev/hda8
    Linux 83 4719 4864 /dev/hda9

  10. #20
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    Quote Originally Posted by zillah
    Why it has been named (/usr1) ?
    I assume you are refering to the "LABEL" of the partition and not to the mount point or directory name. This is the work of Fedora: it wants to LABEL each partition consistent with its mount point. If there exists a partition with name (for example '/usr') same as what it wants to name a given partition during install, it will increment by 1 (for example '/usr1'). As far as I know, this is meaningful only if you reference the partition in /etc/fstab by its LABEL instead of referencing it directly. My preference is to change all LABEL references to "real" references of the '/dev/hdxx' format in /etc/fstab and in /boot/grub/grub.conf. While the LABEL reference method may be useful for an administrator of a significant network, to me, it seems confusing to the casual hacker.

    [quote="You also"]Partition 3 does not end on cylinder boundaryI'm sorry, but I don't know what that means. I've seen it before, but I don't recall a problem related to it. Sounds like it's time to Google.

    Cheers~
    /IMHO
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