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  1. #1

    Command Not Found


    I have just done a installation however I am missing many basic commands that I am trying to use which I would just expect to be there.
    So far I have tried lsusb and fdisk I am sure there are more missing.

    How can I install these?

    Thanks.

  2. #2
    SuperMod (Back again) devils casper's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Kandahar
    I have just done a installation however I am missing many basic commands that I am trying to use which I would just expect to be there.
    So far I have tried lsusb and fdisk I am sure there are more missing.
    commands are already there. you need 'root' privileges to execute those.
    execute 'su -' to gain root privileges.
    Code:
    su -
    fdisk -l




    Casper
    It is amazing what you can accomplish if you do not care who gets the credit.
    New Users: Read This First

  3. #3
    Hello,

    Sorry I should have mentioned that originally. I know it needs root to use the command, I have had to do it on other distros, when editing grub and things.

    This is exactly what Im doing


    [user@ip-082 ~]$ su
    Password:
    [root@ip-082 user]# fdisk
    bash: fdisk: command not found
    [root@ip-082 user]#

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  5. #4
    Linux Newbie
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    Use 'su -' as Casper suggested. Simply running 'su' does not execute the new user's (in this case root's) startup scripts, hence you dont get the /sbin and /usr/sbin in your PATH variable.

  6. #5
    SuperMod (Back again) devils casper's Avatar
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    suffix - ( minus ) sign with 'su' command.
    Code:
    su -

    :: EDIT:: beaten by nikunjb.
    to clarify a bit more, execute this
    Code:
    su 
    echo $PATH
    exit
    su -
    echo $PATH
    compare the output of 'echo' commands.



    Casper
    It is amazing what you can accomplish if you do not care who gets the credit.
    New Users: Read This First

  7. #6
    Okay I see that helps me. I wasnt aware of that.

    I was even trying to run it from the /sbin directory. locate fdisk showed I had it there anyway

    Thanks for clearing that up.

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