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On some linux distros, the first time you use the "sudo" command, you get a little warning message about accepting the responsibility. I entered a "sudo" command in the terminal ...
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  1. #1
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    Does this mean my machine was compromised?


    On some linux distros, the first time you use the "sudo" command, you get a little warning message about accepting the responsibility. I entered a "sudo" command in the terminal just now, and got that message. This is not the first time I have used this command and this installation is not new. The only thing I can think of is that some history file somewhere was erased, so the mechanism that outputs that message thought that sudo hadn't been used before. This makes me think that someone gained access to my box and accidentally/overzealously erased their command history.

    Any thoughts? What should I do?

  2. #2
    Administrator MikeTbob's Avatar
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    If you have entered the wrong password by accident it will give you a warning. Is this what happened?
    I do not respond to private messages asking for Linux help, Please keep it on the forums only.
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  3. #3
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    No, I don't think this is from an incorrect password entry. I think this is because the ".sudo_as_admin_successful" file was somehow removed (at least that's the file name on Ubuntu installs). The first time you use sudo, the file is created and you should no longer receive the warning, but from your description, the ".sudo_as_admin_successful" file did not exist in the home directory for the user you were logged in as.

    What distro are you using? Also, you said that this isn't a new install, but is this a newly created user on that box?

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  5. #4
    Linux Newbie unlimitedscolobb's Avatar
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    I get this kind of message when I change the timezone or just have some brisk time change on my machines. I am almost sure it's not your problem, but this may at least give some direction, I hope.

  6. #5
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    Hey everyone thanks for your replies. I mistype my password all the time and this never happens so I don't think that's the reason. This isn't for a new user and I didn't just change my timezone settings.

    This is on my OpenSUSE 11.4 box. If it makes a difference, this was originally an 11.2 or 11.1 (?) installation that I have distro upgraded repeatedly. I don't have any problems with it, and I haven't had this sudo problem since the one time that I posted about here.

    I haven't looked into the details of what causes this message to display, but I can't imagine it would get erased by accident.

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