Find the answer to your Linux question:
Results 1 to 6 of 6

Thread: password

Enjoy an ad free experience by logging in. Not a member yet? Register.
  1. #1

    password


    Ī'm still somewhat new, but I have a question based on an observation I just saw. I just tried to cha˝ge my password for a user in centos. It kept telling me that the old and new passwords were similiar/the same. But the only similarity was that the old and new had 8 characters. First 4 were letters, the first being capital. Last 4 characters were numbers. Actually the 5th and 6th character were the same numbers in both passwords come to think of it. Anyways, I thought it was interesting on security. But am i right in assuming Linux doesnt allow ANY character to be the same or it doesnt like the same character pattern ?
    Also, is there a way to customize password security for you or your own business needs? (including expiry, etc)

  2. #2
    For account expiration, you can use the chage command(see man chage for details). You need to run that command as root.
    As to the password thing, I tried the same thing in my CentOS box, and got the following message:
    Code:
    BAD PASSWORD: is too similar to the old one
    Then tried a very basic password (1234):
    Code:
    BAD PASSWORD: it is based on a dictionary word
    This seems to be a CentOS thing though, because Debian allows that pattern when you change passwords.
    Here's a link on password security in CentOS: centos.org/docs/4/html/rhel-sg-en-4/s1-wstation-pass.html
    It may be useful for you.
    Good luck and let us know if you need further help.

  3. #3
    Linux Engineer TNFrank's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2013
    Location
    Avondale, AZ.
    Posts
    1,094
    Personally, I'd use a Pass Phrase instead of just a Pass word. A Pass Phrase, like "IhateWindows234" or the like would be harder to crack and easy to remember then just a single word. Also, you get caps, lower case and numbers all in the phrase so there's very little chance of someone hacking it with an automated password cracker.

  4. $spacer_open
    $spacer_close
  5. #4
    Linux Guru
    Join Date
    Oct 2007
    Location
    Tucson AZ
    Posts
    3,190
    I've never used CentOS but have seen similar messages when creating a password but it didn't prevent me from using it. Another thing that makes for more secure passwords is using special characters such as ! or ?, placing them where they wouldn't be expected.

  6. #5

    password

    Quote Originally Posted by yancek View Post
    I've never used CentOS but have seen similar messages when creating a password but it didn't prevent me from using it. Another thing that makes for more secure passwords is using special characters such as ! or ?, placing them where they wouldn't be expected.
    Right. We used to do that at work. @ for a and 3 for e or ! for 1.
    I haven't done too much on the hacking side except getting hash values from windows passwords (my own password not someone else's lol). As for using a similiar password on centos, it wouldn't let me. It made me do a new password and if I kept making it too similiar it would prompt again. It did this 3 times and then said it failed.
    I've still got to look up specifics on password security but I will have more time today. Since Debian does not have this, I'm wondering if this is a Redhat thing as well since Centos is a variation of Redhat I believe.

  7. #6
    Quote Originally Posted by dragonix View Post
    Right. We used to do that at work. @ for a and 3 for e or ! for 1.
    I haven't done too much on the hacking side except getting hash values from windows passwords (my own password not someone else's lol). As for using a similiar password on centos, it wouldn't let me. It made me do a new password and if I kept making it too similiar it would prompt again. It did this 3 times and then said it failed.
    I've still got to look up specifics on password security but I will have more time today. Since Debian does not have this, I'm wondering if this is a Redhat thing as well since Centos is a variation of Redhat I believe.
    The similarity restriction is set through PAM modules. Both pam_cracklib and pam_passwdqc can enforce similarity restrictions.

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •