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i know nothing about security. any obvious things i should know or do to my distro?...
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  1. #1
    Linux Newbie
    Join Date
    Jan 2005
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    104

    Noob question


    i know nothing about security. any obvious things i should know or do to my distro?

  2. #2
    Linux Guru lakerdonald's Avatar
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    Jun 2004
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    St. Petersburg, FL
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    5,035
    1)Turn on the Firewall
    2)Download the newest kernel patches
    3)Keep yourself aware of any Bug/Security Reports for the applications that you use, and be sure to always update to the newest patchlevel.

  3. #3
    Linux Guru bryansmith's Avatar
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    Nov 2004
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    /Ontario/Canada
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    Hi Viper8896,

    One thing to keep in mind is to not use your root account for day to day things. It should only be used when nessecary. If you are not root, nothing can happen to important system files because you will not have the right permissions to access the system files.

    Hope that helps,
    Bryan
    Looking for a distro? Look here.
    "There can be no doubt that all our knowledge begins with experience." - Immanuel Kant (Critique of Pure Reason)
    Queen's University - Arts and Science 2008 (Sociology)
    Registered Linux User #386147.

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  5. #4
    Just Joined!
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    Apr 2005
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    Berlinsville, PA
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    5
    Hello-

    Definitally learn IPtables first. Also, don't keep any un-needed services going (like if you arn't running a web server then don't leave apache running, or proftpd or something simmilar). Turn of sshd if you arn't going to be logging in from other places. And definitally, don't run as root daily. One reason why you shouldn't do this-

    Suppose you are cleaning out a directory with a bunch of sub-directories, you would do something like (assuming you are using a root shell)-

    # rm -r ./

    But if you forget the .

    # rm -r /

    rm -r / deletes EVERYTHING on the system. If you are a regular user, you can't do this. Only root can do this. So, use su if you have to switch over to root.

    You can learn iptables here-
    http://www.iptables.org/

    Hope this helps.

    -Jim

  6. #5
    Linux Newbie
    Join Date
    Jan 2005
    Posts
    104
    i knew all that stuff anyway but if u got any others u could post here also anyone who didnt know will see this.

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