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hi, I'm new to Linux, i had use Windows last time I would like to know how to backup my data in Linux? what are the methodologies available?...
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  1. #1
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    System backup


    hi,
    I'm new to Linux, i had use Windows last time
    I would like to know how to backup my data in Linux?
    what are the methodologies available?
    Proper Planing is a way of success

  2. #2
    Linux Guru fingal's Avatar
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    It depends on your requirements and which distro you are using. I use Mandriva. As a casual desktop user, Mandriva allows me to backup onto various media - CDRs etc., or to backup into a directory. All of this is menu driven. You can do incremental backups or completely new ones.

    Any distro will support the above in one way or another.

    Or you can backup onto a floppy: for small files. You can schedule backups to take place automatically. There are plenty of options.
    I am always doing that which I can not do, in order that I may learn how to do it. - Pablo Picasso

  3. #3
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    Quote Originally Posted by fingal
    It depends on your requirements and which distro you are using. I use Mandriva. As a casual desktop user, Mandriva allows me to backup onto various media - CDRs etc., or to backup into a directory. All of this is menu driven. You can do incremental backups or completely new ones.

    Any distro will support the above in one way or another.

    Or you can backup onto a floppy: for small files. You can schedule backups to take place automatically. There are plenty of options.
    is it Free of charge?
    Proper Planing is a way of success

  4. #4
    Linux Guru fingal's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by thcc2
    is it Free of charge?
    It depends. The idea of 'free' in the world of open source software suggests 'freedom'. Vendors of open source software are free to charge for it, or not.

    My current Mandriva distro cost me 6 which is the price of the magazine it came with. You might order a distro from a mail order supplier, and it would cost you for postage and packing and a few overheads.

    People are free to distribute the operating systems, study OS code and alter/improve that as they see fit, provided they agree to distribute that code under the same license.

    So it might be free of charge, or not. I could pay 60+ for the system I'm currently using, and it would contain extra software and commercial (non-free) drivers, but as my needs are simple I choose to pay a lot less. I could use that 6 system to run a server, or just keep it for desktop applications. It takes time and effort to learn, but it's worth it in the end.
    I am always doing that which I can not do, in order that I may learn how to do it. - Pablo Picasso

  5. #5
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    Quote Originally Posted by fingal
    Quote Originally Posted by thcc2
    is it Free of charge?
    It depends. The idea of 'free' in the world of open source software suggests 'freedom'. Vendors of open source software are free to charge for it, or not.

    My current Mandriva distro cost me 6 which is the price of the magazine it came with. You might order a distro from a mail order supplier, and it would cost you for postage and packing and a few overheads.

    People are free to distribute the operating systems, study OS code and alter/improve that as they see fit, provided they agree to distribute that code under the same license.

    So it might be free of charge, or not. I could pay 60+ for the system I'm currently using, and it would contain extra software and commercial (non-free) drivers, but as my needs are simple I choose to pay a lot less. I could use that 6 system to run a server, or just keep it for desktop applications. It takes time and effort to learn, but it's worth it in the end.
    Before that, my understanding on Open Source is that i no need to pay $ for usage, Got i question i will like to ask u, if i make changes on the source code of the Open Source software, is the owner of the software (eg: Linux RedHat) has the right to sell to other
    Proper Planing is a way of success

  6. #6
    Linux Guru smolloy's Avatar
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    Open Source does not mean it doesn't cost anything. Open Source means that the source code is available for you to view and alter as you like. For more information google on the term "gnu public license" or "GPL" -- that will tell you everything you need.
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  7. #7
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    Quote Originally Posted by smolloy
    Open Source does not mean it doesn't cost anything. Open Source means that the source code is available for you to view and alter as you like. For more information google on the term "gnu public license" or "GPL" -- that will tell you everything you need.
    OK
    Proper Planing is a way of success

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