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Hello, I'm very new to the Linux Web Server world. I cannot find information on this, likely, because I am not searching for the right thing... I don't know what ...
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  1. #1
    Linux Enthusiast flipjargendy's Avatar
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    Question Server Hostname on the Local Network


    Hello, I'm very new to the Linux Web Server world. I cannot find information on this, likely, because I am not searching for the right thing... I don't know what to search for exactly.

    I have an Apache server (Ubuntu Server ) running on my local network. Right now the only way I can access it is by typing in the IP address. I have had a web server installed on my laptop for a while (just for testing a website) and only have to type in my host name.

    How do I go about getting my stand-alone webserver to respond to its own host name?
    Running Linux Since 2001
    Registered Linux User #430868 - Since 91206

  2. #2
    Linux Engineer jledhead's Avatar
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    to respond to a hostname you need to register the name in your internal DNS server.

  3. #3
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    u can type localhost or hostname to access the server . u can find host name of ur computer by typing hostname at the terminal.

  4. #4
    Linux Enthusiast flipjargendy's Avatar
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    Would I go about it by using BIND DNS (for example this guide) I don't really know what to search for.

    Thanks
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  5. #5
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    u don't necessarily need the dns server for accessing the standalone website. i've not installed dns server on my laptop still i can access my web server by either typing hostname or localhost.

    if things are not working , edit the
    /etc/hosts file & add the hostname & ur ip to it & it'll work.

  6. #6
    Linux Enthusiast flipjargendy's Avatar
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    I added line 3 and 4 but it hasn't made a difference. Is this how I should have made it look?

    Code:
    127.0.0.1       localhost
    127.0.1.1       obnoxium
    192.168.0.100   obnoxium
    obnoxium        obnoxium
    
    # The following lines are desirable for IPv6 capable hosts
    ::1     ip6-localhost ip6-loopback
    fe00::0 ip6-localnet
    ff00::0 ip6-mcastprefix
    ff02::1 ip6-allnodes
    ff02::2 ip6-allrouters
    ff02::3 ip6-allhosts
    I want too look on google so I don't keep bothering you guys with this simple stuff (i'll be a regular in this section of the forums now ). What should I do a search for?
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  7. #7
    Linux Engineer jledhead's Avatar
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    if the above is what you added to your web server machine, then that machine should be aware of its hostname and you can open a browser on that machine and use the name. but that still won't fix the name remotely.

    what does your internal network use for name resolution? wins, MS dns, bind?

    if you aren't sure and you just want this to work from your machine only then you can edit your hosts file. if your on windows its (this is from memory) c:\windows\system32\drivers\etc\hosts

    if this is an internal company network though I would imagine you are using some sort of name resolution, report back.

    and btw, I don't think anyone minds questions being asked here, thats the whole point. just don't be afraid to check out google also

  8. #8
    Linux Enthusiast flipjargendy's Avatar
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    Smile

    First off, thank you guys for being so patient. I hope I get a chance to help you out with something someday.


    Here's my setup:

    Router = Linksys DLink Dl-524, just a regular wireless router with RJ-45 ports. It has internet access and the dedicated server and my laptop are hardwired.

    Dedicated Server = Desktop computer with 2 hard drives. The only OS on it is Linux.

    Other Nodes = My laptop (pretty much the only other node ever on the network) which is running Linux on one partition and Windows XP on another.

    I would like to be able to access that dedicated server from any node on the network by typing in the servers hostname, obnoxium. This is going to be a file server for keeping things off my laptop... i've lost a lot of photos and other docs because of failed partitioning before. Hopefully it will be a web server for the network and possibly on the internet one day soon as well.

    Last night I was playing around with settings on my router. I figured there might be something I need to do on there to get things working. There is a few fields for DNS. They are: Primary DNS: input for an IP; Secondary DNS: input for an IP and MTU: input for 4 digit number. I assume that these are for outside servers to communicate with nodes on my network. Is that correct?
    Last edited by flipjargendy; 08-09-2007 at 02:28 PM. Reason: comment about DNS on router...
    Running Linux Since 2001
    Registered Linux User #430868 - Since 91206

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