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Hola, In the recent weeks, I have had great success setting up my MythTV Backend/Frontend Combo system on my Fedora Core 7 computer. I am forever indebted to all of ...
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  1. #1
    Just Joined! TheBirdMan's Avatar
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    Jun 2007
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    Settings Hostnames


    Hola,
    In the recent weeks, I have had great success setting up my MythTV Backend/Frontend Combo system on my Fedora Core 7 computer. I am forever indebted to all of you for your help with that .
    Now I'd like to go further with my setup; I'd like to set up an older Ubuntu system I have to connect with my MythTV server. So I have the frontend installed on the Ubuntu system, but I am unable to connect to the server. From what I'm experiencing, its not an issue with Myth so much as it is with my Linux networking setup. For startings, I was hoping to seek some advice for setting a Hostname. From what I know about Windows, the Hostname identifies the computer, but I've learned the hard way that Linux works differently. My Fedora box was originally named Mars under Windows, and my Ubuntu box was originally named Saturn under Windows. Up until now, I've kept the preinstalled "LocalHost..." as the hostnames. Could someone help me setup my two hostnames properly? I'd greatly appreciate any help!
    Thanks a ton!
    The Bird Man

  2. #2
    Just Joined! TheBirdMan's Avatar
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    Update

    Allow me to clarify my first question

    I've tested both computers with the command "Hostname," and both reply with the names I've set: Saturn and Mars. The two computers are connected through a simple Linksys router, with a few hubs/switches in between. Still, neither computer can ping the other's hostname, but they do return different results:

    On my Ubuntu computer, Saturn, I get the following result--
    peter@Saturn:~$ ping mars
    PING mars.Saturn (209.86.66.93) 56(84) bytes of data.

    --- mars.Saturn ping statistics ---
    16 packets transmitted, 0 received, 100% packet loss, time 15068ms
    HOWEVER, I have set a static IP on Mars, my Fedora computer, which I can ping--
    peter@Saturn:~$ ping 192.168.1.133
    PING 192.168.1.133 (192.168.1.133) 56(84) bytes of data.
    64 bytes from 192.168.1.133: icmp_seq=1 ttl=64 time=0.463 ms
    64 bytes from 192.168.1.133: icmp_seq=2 ttl=64 time=0.201 ms
    64 bytes from 192.168.1.133: icmp_seq=3 ttl=64 time=0.190 ms
    64 bytes from 192.168.1.133: icmp_seq=4 ttl=64 time=0.188 ms

    --- 192.168.1.133 ping statistics ---
    4 packets transmitted, 4 received, 0% packet loss, time 3004ms
    rtt min/avg/max/mdev = 0.188/0.260/0.463/0.118 ms

    When I ping Saturn, my Ubuntu box, from Mars, I'm simply told that Saturn is an unknown host.

    By now, I think I've narrowed the problem down to my Fedora computer, Mars.

    Could someone help me properly set up my hostnames? Thanks a million!

  3. #3
    Blackfooted Penguin daark.child's Avatar
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    You need to edit /etc/hosts on each computer and put something like
    Code:
    127.0.0.1       localhost.localdomain   localhost
    ::1             localhost6.localdomain6 localhost6
    192.168.1.1   saturn.somedomain    saturn
    192.168.1.2   mars.somedomain      mars
    Basically you are telling each system which IP address matches a certain host. For the part I listed as "somedomain", I use a completely made up domain name (home.lan). Don't use any TL domains unless you actually own them.

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