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Hello, I'm setting up a Domain Name System server through BIND9, under Debian Etch. It resides within a DMZ subnetwork which correcly recieves incoming port 53/udp-tcp requests forwarded by an ...
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  1. #1
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    [SOLVED] DNS Problem


    Hello,

    I'm setting up a Domain Name System server through BIND9, under Debian Etch. It resides within a DMZ subnetwork which correcly recieves incoming port 53/udp-tcp requests forwarded by an iptables firewall. I've configured it to be the authoritative server for a domain I own. I asked the registrar to add to their NS records the public static IP that identifies my DNS server (which, as I have said, contains the zone data for my domain).

    The registrar answers he can't, arguing he needs a registered name for that DNS server. So he's asking me to have what I'd like to achieve through my request.

    What can I do?

  2. #2
    Linux Engineer rcgreen's Avatar
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    nslookup <address>

    should give you a name. If you are paying for a fixed address,
    that should satisfy, but if you are on a normal consumer type
    account, your mileage may vary.

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    nslookup <address>
    should give you a name.
    a.Red-b-c-d.staticIP.rima-tde.net

    Yeah, I thought that once. Ok rcgreen. One more question. Is there a serious problem if I use only one DNS server? Do you recommend using at least two? In this case, the secondary should be within a different network, I'm right? Is there any problem if I ask the registrar for only one DNS server? In the case the registrar should specify two nameservers, could specify the same name for both?

    Only minor doubts, thanks...

  4. #4
    Linux Guru Lazydog's Avatar
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    A true Register will require a minimum of 2 DNS servers.
    It is in the RFC's

    If your Provide has assigned this IP Address to you I would request that he change his DNS server to reflect this.

    Regards
    Robert

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    If your Provide has assigned this IP Address to you I would request that he change his DNS server to reflect this.
    Do you mean asking the ISP (yes, it assigns the IP automatically) to change its DNS, which binds a.Red-b-c-d.staticIP.rima-tde.net with a.b.c.d ? I don't underestand what for... Or ask the regsitrar? (I've done it yet)

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    nslookup <addr> says a.Red-b-c-d.staticIP.rima-tde.net


    I asked them to use this nameserver for my domain. Here's the response of the technicians who administer my domain (it seems the technicians work for another company):

    a.Red-b-c-d.staticIP.rima-tde.net is not an authorized nameserver either. All com and net domains with com or net nameservers, needs the nameservers to be registered before they are used. The hoster of the parent domain has to do the registration. So if the nameserver was Bjerva.sulutjelma.com, the registrar for sulutjelma.com had to do this job. We cannot do it for them.
    Sincerely, I don't know what to do.

  7. #7
    Linux Engineer rcgreen's Avatar
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    I think they are saying that, since your IP address resolves to
    a domain owned by your ISP (rather obvious), you must
    work it out with the ISP.

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    I didn't know that DNS servers have to be registered by the ISP. I thought it was valid any IP or hostname not related to the domain in question. Ok.

    One more question. Do you know of free services which provide Secondary DNS's? Any reference is enough... Thanks.

  9. #9
    Linux Guru Lazydog's Avatar
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    OK, please answer the following questions.

    1. What is the Domain of your ISP?

    2. What is your Domain?

    3. Where is your Domain registered?

    4. What IP Address range has been assigned to you by your ISP?

    Lets start at the ground floor and work our way up.

    Regards
    Robert

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