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We have an office with 18 PCs. I want to add some networked printers connected to the ethernet i.e. direct and not shared from an XP/Vista PC. The idea is ...
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  1. #1
    Just Joined! roger's Avatar
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    Adding networked printers


    We have an office with 18 PCs. I want to add some networked printers connected to the ethernet i.e. direct and not shared from an XP/Vista PC. The idea is to rationalize all the shared ones.

    Does anyone know how or where the drivers are installed?

    I also intend to add a Linux server for proper file sharing, does the server have any special control over these printers seeing as they are not hosted on the server?

    If there is a better way of arranging the printers considering a Linux server on the network these please advise. Thanks.

  2. #2
    Super Moderator Roxoff's Avatar
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    The drivers are loaded onto the individual pc's. If the printer is on the network, it behaves as if it's connected directly to each PC.

    You could set up a printer queue on the linux machine and have that manage access to the printer, but there's little point unless you want to provide a secure access to the printer - and if you do, you wont want your printer on the network, you'll probaby want it connected directly to the print server.

    Using a printer queue on a fileserver machine is the answer to the second part of your question too, it can grant special control if you want. Personally I think you gain nothing doing that, though. Printers with network cards generally behave well for multiple printing machines on a lan.

    The best way of arranging network printers is to do what you're looking at - put the printers on the network and let all machines, be they Linux, MacOS, Windows or whatever, print in their own way to the printers network interface.
    Linux user #126863 - see http://linuxcounter.net/

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    Just Joined! roger's Avatar
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    Thanks I was hoping not to install drivers on each station. Is there some lit that has the driver on the printer or the associated printer server (the type used to connect USB printers to the network)? Otherwise I think that's the way to go, maybe try a wifi connection from the printer server to the printer so that we can have two printers in one room served from one device.

    Comments welcome.

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    Super Moderator Roxoff's Avatar
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    The package that handles print serving on Linux is called CUPS, which stands for Common Unix Printing System, and they've got lots of information about setting it up on their website.
    Linux user #126863 - see http://linuxcounter.net/

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    Just Joined! roger's Avatar
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    Not sure if that answers my previous post?

    Does CUPS deal with printers not directly attached to the server?

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    Super Moderator Roxoff's Avatar
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    Yes, but stopping users connecting directly to the printer and forcing them to go through your Linux print server may not be possible.
    Linux user #126863 - see http://linuxcounter.net/

  8. #7
    Just Joined! roger's Avatar
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    OK, thanks, I think I've got it now; buy in some print servers and configure those and use CUPS if the Linux file server need to print stuff out.

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