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Hi there, I was wondering what you guys thought about a fileserver, I was thinking of using RAID 1 with centOS 5. Is there anything I should check BIOS wise ...
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  1. #1
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    Which OS/hardware for file server?


    Hi there,

    I was wondering what you guys thought about a fileserver, I was thinking of using RAID 1 with centOS 5. Is there anything I should check BIOS wise in terms of recovery if a disk fails?

    The file server will need samba, hamachi and backups settting up so I was wondering what the more experienced would use? I am starting to become a fan of duplicity for backups at the moment .

  2. #2
    Linux Guru Rubberman's Avatar
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    Duplicity is, AFAIK, just a front-end for rsync, which is what I use for backups that are not bit-image clones of a disc/file-system. For simple file servers, which 24x7 uptime isn't required on disc failure, then I recommend something like LVM2 to create a large virtual volume/disc for files, and rsync to backup the data. If you really need 24x7 uptime, then a RAID is appropriate (you still need a drive cage w/ hot-swap capabilities), although there will be an reduction in write performance. If the system is read-mostly, then you should actually see a performance gain with multiple concurrent users if the RAID is configured with raid-5 or 10 (striping, not mirroring).

    Samba doesn't care where the data is (regular disc, LVM, or RAID), so that is not really an issue here. My data is on an LVM (not RAID), and I use Samba from Windows systems to access it all the time.
    Sometimes, real fast is almost as good as real time.
    Just remember, Semper Gumbi - always be flexible!

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    Thanks Rubberman,

    I'm leaning towards:

    RAID 5 with hot swappable drives (depending on cost i might switch to simple RAID 1)

    Duplicity backing up to a remote ftp server off site.

    So just to check my theory, with RAID 5, if a drive fails, the file server can continue as normal while i replace it?

    Apologies for my noobness but what exactly does an LVM do? Is it like a software RAID? Or do you assign what volume with a group of disks?

  4. #4
    Linux Guru Rubberman's Avatar
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    LVM (Logical Volume Manager) allows you to "merge" multiple physical drives into one or more logical/virtual drives, so the OS sees them as one big file system. On my system, I have 4 500GB drives mounted as a single 2TB file system. RAID allows you to do much the same thing, but with the ability to continue operation when one of the drives fails. I have mine mounted as /home.
    Sometimes, real fast is almost as good as real time.
    Just remember, Semper Gumbi - always be flexible!

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