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Hi guys, The situation is as follows: Server: 10.0.0.58, Ubuntu 10.10 Client: 10.0.0.211 OSX 10.6.5 Router: 10.0.0.2 What I need is captial.dev to point to 10.0.0.58, as well as *.capital.dev ...
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  1. #1
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    Subdomains on Ubuntu - Linux server gurus needed


    Hi guys,

    The situation is as follows:

    Server: 10.0.0.58, Ubuntu 10.10
    Client: 10.0.0.211 OSX 10.6.5
    Router: 10.0.0.2

    What I need is captial.dev to point to 10.0.0.58, as well as *.capital.dev. Subdomains WON'T be in their own directories, instead we'll just use PHP to call up a certain database depending on the subdomain. E.g. test.capital.dev will point to 10.0.0.58 and load up the test database, helloworld.capital.dev will load up the helloworld database, etc. How do I configure the server to handle the subdomains? I've tried following a few bind9 tutorials but I can't get any of them to work as they should. Any and all help would be appreciated.

  2. #2
    Linux Guru Rubberman's Avatar
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    First of all, 10.x.y.z is a class 1 network (non-routed). The 10. is the network address, and x.y.z make up the device address, allowing up to 16M distinct devices. You can create a HUGE number of subnets with this, depending upon how many devices maximum you want to have in each subnet. In any case, the key to all that is in the subnet mask.

    So, that brings us to your sub-domain problem. You really need each sub-domain in its own subnet. That will partition your network space more simply. You still need to have a local DNS server that can manage the local domain name lookups that you need.

    In any case, this isn't a simple "connect the dots" sort of problem. You need to understand what your are doing so you don't fubar your network. Get some good network books and start learning what it all means. I've been teaching a college class (4 hours credit) to AT&T employees that covers most of this stuff, at least as far as the subnetting and such is concerned (we don't get into sub-domains at all), that is a full semester of study (60 classroom and lab hours). Don't expect to master it with a few questions on the forums and poking around the manpages...

    Good luck!
    Sometimes, real fast is almost as good as real time.
    Just remember, Semper Gumbi - always be flexible!

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