Find the answer to your Linux question:
Results 1 to 9 of 9
I have a vps with godaddy running centos 5 w/plesk 9.5, and I might be loosing traffic. I have been working with a guy that does email blasts, and he ...
Enjoy an ad free experience by logging in. Not a member yet? Register.
  1. #1
    Just Joined!
    Join Date
    Sep 2011
    Posts
    5

    Unhappy Is my server rejecting traffic? How can I tell?


    I have a vps with godaddy running centos 5 w/plesk 9.5, and I might be loosing traffic.

    I have been working with a guy that does email blasts, and he has a server that the links in his emails go to which redirects to my site. When his server does the redirect it logs the email address, the IP, and the url.

    His did a drop of 6k emails the the other day and hist server logged over 600 clicks. My analytics picked up around 70 from the blast. So i installed tuned apache and mysql for more connections and memory. Then I installed apachetop to monitor the next plast. Last night we did the blast and I received around 2 clicks by the time he had logged 78 clicks.

    When we click the link in his email it works, apachetop shows the request, my analytic s show the visit, and there is no apparent issues.

    How could this be? Is it possible that my server is not accepting the http requests at all, bouncing them before they make it to apache to proccess? If so, where might I go about in view this and how might I fix it.

    What else could it be? I thought maybe DNS, but every nslookup tool i tried on the web resolved correctly.

    Please Help!

  2. #2
    Trusted Penguin Irithori's Avatar
    Join Date
    May 2009
    Location
    Munich
    Posts
    3,412
    May I ask, where these 6k email adresses come from and if these people actually want to get email or at the very least have the chance to opt-out?

    I read your post and "spam" was the first thing that came to mind,
    because of the choosing of words ("blast", "guy who does that") and also mechanics: Maybe the 600 clicks gave enough impression to the people who actually visited your site to not do that a second time..

    But to answer your question: If you do get at least one request, then the setup should work, nothing is blocked.
    You must always face the curtain with a bow.

  3. #3
    Just Joined!
    Join Date
    Sep 2011
    Posts
    5
    How could it be that his server redirects 600 people but only 70 something land? This is real time, not repeat visitors. Is there a way to monitory the connections coming into my server? Can I intercept the requests before apache tries to process them?

  4. $spacer_open
    $spacer_close
  5. #4
    Trusted Penguin Irithori's Avatar
    Join Date
    May 2009
    Location
    Munich
    Posts
    3,412
    AdBlock or similar software can explain the difference.
    Yes, one can see all traffic with e.g. tcpdump.
    Code:
    man tcpdump
    Plus:
    The 600 people he sees are just the ones from an email counter pixel.
    It doesnt neccessarily mean, that they also clicked on any link.
    Last edited by Irithori; 09-27-2011 at 03:44 PM.
    You must always face the curtain with a bow.

  6. #5
    Just Joined!
    Join Date
    Sep 2011
    Posts
    5
    His server logs add the redirect to a log, its not a pixel fire, these number are coming from a log generated when the redirect takes place, not when the email is opened.

  7. #6
    Trusted Penguin Irithori's Avatar
    Join Date
    May 2009
    Location
    Munich
    Posts
    3,412
    Then tcpdump is a way to look into this.

    Coming back to my questions: Are these people in anyway associated to you or your company? Do they expect emails? And do they have the chance to opt-out?
    You must always face the curtain with a bow.

  8. #7
    Just Joined!
    Join Date
    Sep 2011
    Posts
    5
    Yes, of course they do. This is not spam, these are opt-in subscribers.

    These man pages are a little to deep for me. What do I have to say to get it to monitor port 80 and spit out the referring host?

  9. #8
    Trusted Penguin Irithori's Avatar
    Join Date
    May 2009
    Location
    Munich
    Posts
    3,412
    Ok, just checking.

    For a start, something like this:
    Code:
    tcpdump 'host <YOUR WEBSERVER> and port 80'
    Then browse your site, especially the links in the mail.
    Watch your apache logs.

    To get to the payload, one can either use -s 0 and analyse the tcp stream,
    or (better) use wget or curl to see http headers and/or body
    You must always face the curtain with a bow.

  10. #9
    Just Joined!
    Join Date
    Sep 2011
    Posts
    5
    Thank you, that's a great start. I will spend some time on that today while traffic should be coming. Thank you for the help.

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •