Find the answer to your Linux question:
Results 1 to 7 of 7
Hello, can any one suggest me the best Linux Mail Server and possibly the helping guide links. I shall be thank full to you....
Enjoy an ad free experience by logging in. Not a member yet? Register.
  1. #1
    Just Joined!
    Join Date
    Mar 2007
    Posts
    3

    Best Linux Mail Server ???


    Hello, can any one suggest me the best Linux Mail Server and possibly the helping guide links. I shall be thank full to you.

  2. #2
    Super Moderator Roxoff's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2005
    Location
    Nottingham, England
    Posts
    3,845
    There are four main Open Source mail transport agents, Postfix, Exim, Sendmail and Qmail. I like Sendmail, it's horrible to set up, but once done you never need to touch it. Having said that, I'd recommend Postfix for new installations these days.

    Each of these have different strengths and weaknesses - so it depends what you're trying to achieve. But you might want to check out this page at Wikipedia which compares mail transport agents

    Of course, they're just the mail back-end system that will shunt your email around the place, they don't let you do much with it. You probably want to look at Dovecot or Courier to do your POP3 or IMAP access.

    Then you might want a mail reader front-end, perhaps a web service like Squirrelmail or similar.

    These are mostly included on that wikipedia page I linked above.
    Linux user #126863 - see http://linuxcounter.net/

  3. #3
    Linux Enthusiast Mudgen's Avatar
    Join Date
    Feb 2007
    Location
    Virginia
    Posts
    664
    With great sorrow, I support what Roxoff says.

    I've been doing sendmail since it bumped mmdf off the map, and it's never been easier to set up than it is now, with m4 configuration built in. But postfix makes more sense for building a skill set and for new installs. I like Dovecot over Courier, hands down. Squirrelmail is solid and easy to set up out of the box, but quite limited. And the add-ons can work just well enough to drive you crazy.

  4. #4
    Just Joined!
    Join Date
    May 2008
    Posts
    9
    Workt a wile with smeserver 7 easy to install and easy to use.
    google smeserver and have fun.

  5. #5
    Just Joined! bcsi's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jun 2007
    Posts
    8
    @mtbse
    To get a truly meaningful answer you first have to specify:
    a) The environment you'll be running in.
    b) The email volume (numbers and storage required).
    c) Number of users.
    d) mbox or maildir mailboxes.
    e) The added features you want to add (spamassassin, black lists, etc.)
    f)Your level of expertise at being a MTA admin.

    For simple home use, why are you setting up your own MTA?

    For a small office, see above or use postfix (it's simple to set up, just answer a few questions on a deb install).

    For a medium office postfix, exim, qmail or sendmail will all do the job. I've got experience with postfix, exim and sendmail. I personally like exim as it's relatively easy to set up, very versatile and has great community support (exim.org). I don't use the rpm's or deb's and always compile from source. Sendmail is very powerful but a bear to learn and set up properly. The O'Reilly book is over 2 inches thick!

    For an isp you darned well better know what you're doing and since you're asking the question on this forum I suspect you don't. That wasn't a put down, just an observation. That last thing the Internet needs is another mis-configured MTA.

    Cheers.

  6. #6
    Just Joined!
    Join Date
    Jun 2013
    Posts
    2
    Quote Originally Posted by bcsi View Post
    @mtbse
    To get a truly meaningful answer you first have to specify:
    .<snip>.
    Cheers.

    To answer your questions.
    a) Lubuntu 13.04 to start, ultimately on Raspberry Pi Raspian
    b) Less than 50 emails per day for all users
    c) Less than 10 users wth some being simple redirects
    d) Not sure what the question is ?
    e) will utlimately want to put on some aggressive SPAM filtering
    f) Some small corporate network (Linux & Windows (including Exchange)) management that came from being the only geek present
    NO in-depth MTA experience on Linux
    g) The intent is primarily for home use, with some distant family members using the domain name for mail.
    h) Sick of paying through the nose and being dependent on some faceless support that has often less knowledge than me.

    I have looked at Citadel (---.citadel.org)
    And though the ducky-pond install for Raspberry Pi
    ---.ducky-pond.com/posts/9
    looks pretty straightforward, but it has all kinds of stuff I don't need.

    Just want simple Pop3, SMTP and maybe IMAP

  7. #7
    Just Joined! bcsi's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jun 2007
    Posts
    8
    Goodness, a post from the past.

    Quote Originally Posted by NuxNik View Post
    To answer your questions.
    a) Lubuntu 13.04 to start, ultimately on Raspberry Pi Raspian
    b) Less than 50 emails per day for all users
    c) Less than 10 users wth some being simple redirects
    d) Not sure what the question is ?
    e) will utlimately want to put on some aggressive SPAM filtering
    f) Some small corporate network (Linux & Windows (including Exchange)) management that came from being the only geek present
    NO in-depth MTA experience on Linux
    g) The intent is primarily for home use, with some distant family members using the domain name for mail.
    h) Sick of paying through the nose and being dependent on some faceless support that has often less knowledge than me.

    I have looked at Citadel (---.citadel.org)
    And though the ducky-pond install for Raspberry Pi
    ---.ducky-pond.com/posts/9
    looks pretty straightforward, but it has all kinds of stuff I don't need.

    Just want simple Pop3, SMTP and maybe IMAP
    @NuxNik

    I'd stay with whatever comes with the distribution which is Postfix for the MTA and Dovecot for the MDA.

    A couple of notes:

    1) Make sure that you have strong passwords and encryption for your remote users.

    2) After setup verify that your server is not an open relay which would allow anyone on the Internet to relay email through your server. This accomplished using passwords and ip address filtering on the MTA. If you don't and the spammers find out your server will quickly be listed in the block lists thereby having all you email being bounced back.

    3) Determine whether your isp allows SMTP traffic to port 25 through their network or if you will need to use their SMTP server as a smart host relay. This may circumvent what you're trying to accomplish in point 'h' but there are inexpensive ways around this such as dyn.com and their DynECT Email Delivery Lite at $3.00 per month. This is for sending email. It gets a bit more complicated for receiving outside emails. If your isp doesn't filter port 25 traffic then great.

    4) Make sure whoever hosts your domain name sets up the MX records properly and also sets up a reverse lookup as some sites look at these things to determine if the email is spam. Also, if you are sending from a dynamic ip address that's another strike against you.

    5) What happens to the incoming email if your server is down? Will you be setting up a backup MX record? To where? How will you get the email from the backup? Usually MTA's are configured to try sending an email for 4 days before bouncing the email back to the user.

    6) I'm not sure if the Rpi is up to the task (especially id you want to do spam and virus filtering and using IMAP), but it doesn't hurt to try. All you'll lose is email. :P

    I could go on but I suggest you start doing some reading to get at least the basics.

    I hope this helped.

    Oh, as for 'd) mbox or maildir mailboxes' those are just two of the formats for storing emails. You'll be using the default of mbox.

    Good luck and cheers.

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •