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Hi, I have a Linux server with Fasthosts and I am trying to install an SSL certificate. I actually did this a few years ago on the same server, but ...
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  1. #1
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    How do I access conf.d directory via FTP?


    Hi, I have a Linux server with Fasthosts and I am trying to install an SSL certificate. I actually did this a few years ago on the same server, but now that my certificate has expired, I have forgotten how to install the new one!
    I just need to upload the three certificate files to etc/httpd/conf.d/ssl, but I can't access those directories using FTP because my user (presumably) only has permission to access the folders of my website.
    I can log in using the Fasthosts Remote Access Console, which lets me type commands directly into the server, and view its screen remotely. I know that two years ago I could drill down and access all of the folders using FTP, but now I can only see the website folder, which is in /home.
    Can anybody direct me to a tutorial on how to give my FTP user access to the etc/httpd/conf.d/ssl directory, or explain it if it's easy?
    I apologise in advance if that has already been answered before, I did try to search but couldn't find anything.
    Many thanks in advance for any help you can give.

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    Edit: I've managed to upload the files to a higher up directory (still under public_html though) and move them to the /ssl directory using the mv command, so problem solved, but I would still be very interested to find the answer to my original post. Many thanks.

  3. #3
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    there are ways to modify FTP so that you would have access to the entire root directory, but that is NOT advisable. You would be better off implementing SFTP (part of the OpenSSH suite). it is probably already installed and running, so you should already be able to use it (if you have full control over the server, that is).

    If you are using Windows as a client to access the Linux server, you can use WinSCP or FileZilla to connect to the SFTP daemon and push/pull files.

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    Many thanks, Atreyu. What is the normal way to load files into directories which are below the ones you have normal access to with FTP? Is it the way I did it - to FTP them to a directory just below public_html and then move them to the correct directory using the command line?
    I will have a go with SFTP, I have full control over the server.

    Edit: I tried setting FileZilla to log in using SFTP (without implementing SFTP, this was the first thing I tried, using Filezilla), and it worked fine! I can now see all the folders. Filezilla did give me a warning saying that "The server's host key is unknown. You have no guarantee that the server is the computer you think it is". I carried on and it worked fine, presumably I can trust it because I'd just been logging into the same IP address using FTP, and it's definitely the right computer!

    Thanks again.
    Last edited by mosis; 06-07-2012 at 12:54 PM.

  6. #5
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    Quote Originally Posted by mosis View Post
    What is the normal way to load files into directories which are below the ones you have normal access to with FTP? Is it the way I did it - to FTP them to a directory just below public_html and then move them to the correct directory using the command line?
    if you can't chdir within the FTP session itself - then yes. there are ways to specify the root directory, either globally, or per user. if you are using vsftpd, then check out the man page:

    Code:
    man vsftpd.conf
    Edit: I tried setting FileZilla to log in using SFTP (without implementing SFTP, this was the first thing I tried, using Filezilla), and it worked fine! I can now see all the folders. Filezilla did give me a warning saying that "The server's host key is unknown. You have no guarantee that the server is the computer you think it is". I carried on and it worked fine, presumably I can trust it because I'd just been logging into the same IP address using FTP, and it's definitely the right computer!
    You can ignore that warning, that just means it is the first time you've connected via SSH to the computer. A "known_hosts" file should have been generated which stores the fingerprint of the client PC on the Linux PC, so that future connections won't issue that warning.

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