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I have a SAN whose partitions are mounted on the servers (running on Windows OS) using HBA card having fiber connectivity. These servers are connected to LAN. I have another ...
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  1. #1
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    Mounting Windows Partition in Linux


    I have a SAN whose partitions are mounted on the servers (running on Windows OS) using HBA card having fiber connectivity. These servers are connected to LAN. I have another server on LAN to which I want to have this partition available but do not have the fiber connectivity.

    Can I do it the other way round by mounting the SAN partition on windows server; sharing it and then mounting it on linux. The windows server is a part of ADS. How do I exactly go for it?

  2. #2
    Linux Newbie arespi's Avatar
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    You will need samba. Samba is a special software that allows linux systems to interact with windows servers. Depending on your linux server distribution you may already have an applet o menu option that says something like "connect to server", if you don't, here is a guide that might help you:

    The Official Samba 3.5.x HOWTO and Reference Guide

    Good luck

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    Thanks a lot!!!

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    Linux Guru Rubberman's Avatar
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    Windows network shares use what is called CIFS (Common Internet File System), which is a more current version of Samba (as per the other replies). To mount a windows share on Linux, you would do something like thins:
    Code:
    sudo mount -t cifs share-ip/dir mount-point -o options
    where share-ip/dir would be the IP address + share directory from Windows, and mount-point would be the local directory where you want to find that data. Example:
    Code:
    sudo mount -t cifs //192.168.1.10/sharedir /mnt/sharedir -o user=myname,password=mypassword,uid=myname,gid=mygroup
    Sometimes, real fast is almost as good as real time.
    Just remember, Semper Gumbi - always be flexible!

  5. #5
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    Thanks Rubberman....that's what I have been looking for.
    Many many thanks....it worked great for me!

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