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Ok we both understand eachother :P here a little tutorial that, I'm sure, will get your things working... anyway this is the "proper" way to set the folder to a ...
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  1. #11
    Linux Engineer
    Join Date
    Nov 2004
    Location
    Montreal, Canada
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    1,267

    Ok we both understand eachother :P

    here a little tutorial that, I'm sure, will get your things working... anyway this is the "proper" way to set the folder to a specific userGROUP

    If the setgid bit on a directory entry is set, files in that directory will have the group ownership as the directory, instead of than the group of the user that created the file.

    This attribute is helpful when several users need access to certain files. If the users work in a directory with the setgid attribute set then any files created in the directory by any of the users will have the permission of the group. For example, the administrator can create a group called spcprj and add the users Kathy and Mark to the group spcprj. The directory spcprjdir can be created with the set GID bit set and Kathy and Mark although in different primary groups can work in the directory and have full access to all files in that directory, but still not be able to access files in each other's primary group.

    The following command will set the GID bit on a directory:

    chmod g+s spcprjdir

    The directory listing of the directory "spcprjdir":

    drwxrwsr-x 2 kathy spcprj 1674 Sep 17 1999 spcprjdir

    The "s'' in place of the execute bit in the group permissions causes all files written to the directory "spcprjdir" to belong to the group "spcprj" .


    In the hope it helps, have a nice day
    \"Meditative mind\'s is like a vast ocean... whatever strikes the surface, the bottom stays calm\" - Dalai Lama
    \"Competition ultimatly comes down to one thing... a loser and a winner.\" - Ugo Deschamps

  2. #12
    Just Joined!
    Join Date
    Dec 2004
    Location
    Belgium
    Posts
    62
    finally I got it working, looked like vsftpd will control the umask of uploaded files...
    I set umask in vsftpd.conf to 007
    now every uploaded file get rw attributes for user and group...
    except the x attribute will not work since I thought 0 stands for rwx
    davy

  3. #13
    Linux Engineer
    Join Date
    Nov 2004
    Location
    Montreal, Canada
    Posts
    1,267
    Good to know... it would have saved a few posts if I knew this already... I'll know for next time..

    Thanks for the follow up
    \"Meditative mind\'s is like a vast ocean... whatever strikes the surface, the bottom stays calm\" - Dalai Lama
    \"Competition ultimatly comes down to one thing... a loser and a winner.\" - Ugo Deschamps

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