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  1. #11

    this is it if this helps? see attatchment

    Cheers
    Attached Images Attached Images

  2. #12
    i only see the device /dev/mmcblk0p1, which is your SD Card. is the USB device attached to the Pi? you can make sure with these commands, once it is connected:

    Code:
    lsusb
    sudo fdisk -l

  3. #13
    yeah i think it is. see attachments. Cheers
    Attached Images Attached Images

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  5. #14
    okay, it is attached (/dev/sda1, i think) - it is just not mounted.

    i see, however, that it is a windows filesystem (according to fdisk anyway). is this the case, and if so, is there some reason you wish to preserve this filesystem? if i were you, i'd reformat it with a native linux filesystem, like ext4, so that you could take advantage of ACLs, as well as making it more Linux friendly storage in general.

  6. #15
    Yeah I use a windows 8 laptop to transfer the files to the harddrive through the windows protocol. I use tablets and phones to wirelessly access the files using a smb app. The HDD is 4tb and full of stuff so really hard to temporary transfer over and re format. Is their a way I can do it with the current setup

  7. #16
    Quote Originally Posted by morgiee View Post
    Yeah I use a windows 8 laptop to transfer the files to the harddrive through the windows protocol. I use tablets and phones to wirelessly access the files using a smb app. The HDD is 4tb and full of stuff so really hard to temporary transfer over and re format. Is their a way I can do it with the current setup
    okay. transferring 4gb of data is not fun, although i'd argue that you could still convert to ext4, then access it via smb served up by the Pi.

    anyway, it turns out that you can access the NTFS permissions in linux after all. See this informed answer on the topic. it seems to be worth your while to give it a whirl.

  8. #17
    I think your first option sounds the best:

    "okay. transferring 4tb of data is not fun, although i'd argue that you could still convert to ext4, then access it via smb served up by the Pi"

    As the link you provided is too mind boggling. Cant make any sense of it. Didn't realise making two login accounts and setting permissions for one was difficult lol.

  9. #18
    okay, so if you don't want to do NTFS permissions on Linux, there is one last thing you can try (as far as I know) before reformatting with ext4.

    i kind of suggested this before, so i'll try again: put all your files that you want to be read-only in its own subdir. for example, if your usb drive is mounted to /data, then make a public subdir under that, and put all your "public" dirs there. so the dir structure might look like:

    Code:
    /data/public/
    /data/public/Photos
    /data/public/Videos
    /data/public/Music
    leave everything else in the root of /data.

    now put something like this in your smb.conf file:

    Code:
    [public_share]
            comment = public share
            path = /data/public
            valid users = public_user
            guest ok = no
            writable = no
    
    [private_share]
            comment = private share
            path = /data
            valid users = private_user
            guest ok = no
            writable = yes
    and restart samba.

    also, create the Linux and Samba users, if they don't already exist.

    a user who accesses the share "public_share" as user "public_user" will have Read-only access to the /data/public dir and everything under it.

    a user who accesses the share "private_share" as user "private_user" will have Read-write access to all of /data (including the stuff under /data/public).

    Note that the files/dirs in /data must be writable by "private_user" at the filesystem level before you can expect them to work via samba.

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