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  1. #1

    What is "cloud"?


    I've brought up this issue before here, but what is "cloud", exactly? Why would someone need a remote OS?

  2. #2
    Linux Guru Rubberman's Avatar
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    "Cloud" is for when you either don't have the resources, or don't want to build, configure, maintain, update your own server and network equipment and software stack. You "offshore" it, so to speak, to someone like AWS, Microsoft, Google, Rackspace, et al. Since you are only paying for the resources you use, it can be much more cost effective than doing it all yourself, especially if you have needs for more than one simple service, such as email or a simple web server.
    Sometimes, real fast is almost as good as real time.
    Just remember, Semper Gumbi - always be flexible!

  3. #3
    .... and what kind of needs would those be? Give me an example......

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  5. #4
    Linux Newbie arespi's Avatar
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    For example: In the old times, lets say a business, wanted to use IT they would have to hire some IT staff, a sysadmin, maybe a network engineer, maybe some developers , and buy some servers: a file server , an application server (ERP and that kind of stuff) an maybe an email server , and scale it to the size of the business. But now they can hire all those services that will live somewhere outside the business itself in "cloud" on the internet (where? for the business doesn't really matter as long as they are available when needed) , it's a matter of evaluating the pros and cons of each arrangement and choose whatever suits the business best.

  6. #5
    It still sounds like you're talking marketing-speak.

    What's stopping them from hiring any random web hosting co?

  7. #6
    Linux Newbie arespi's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by resetreset View Post
    It still sounds like you're talking marketing-speak.

    What's stopping them from hiring any random web hosting co?
    Nothing really

  8. #7
    ... so it's a scam?

    If I was a company, using email, the LAST thing I would want is for those emails to be stored on a server - "offshore"!!

  9. #8
    Linux Newbie arespi's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by resetreset View Post
    ... so it's a scam?

    If I was a company, using email, the LAST thing I would want is for those emails to be stored on a server - "offshore"!!
    I wouldn't say a scam.

    When somebody hire a cloud service they must be aware the their data in the "cloud" can be anyware , even spread in several sites. Remember I mention that the pros and cons should be evaluated? Well, that is a con.

    Another is the reliabity of the service. At work they hired a "Symantec cloud backup" it worked fine until about a year ago that symantec said thank you very much but the service will no longer be available. And that was it, bye bye.

  10. #9
    Linux Enthusiast sgosnell's Avatar
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    The term cloud encompasses much more than this. Now you can use applications stored entirely on servers, without having to install them on your machine. Microsoft Office 365, Google Docs, etc are examples of this. The cloud also includes services like Google Drive, Dropbox, Box, Copy, et al, which are just storage services. This is how chromebooks work, mostly - the applications are really on servers somewhere, and you don't need the large drives on your local computer. You use Google Docs, Slides, etc for the work, and Google Drive for storage. This terrifies some people, so there will always be a capability to do everything locally, and really, it can all be done locally on a chromebook if you want to do it that way. But things are moving to the cloud, slowly but inevitably, for most things. Many businesses have already moved everything to Google, Microsoft, or another cloud provider. Everything is available anywhere, without having to pay for a dedicated network, servers, IT staff, etc. For a small business it's a good deal, or even for a larger company. End-to-end encryption makes it relatively secure, probably as secure as a dedicated network which can be hacked much easier than that of a truly professional company. Hacking into Google or Microsoft isn't as easy as getting into a network guarded by low-paid poorly-trained IT staffers.

  11. #10
    the term cloud is really kind of foggy.

    it's not at all clear what it means, other than that you use something over the internet, that is not on your own machine.

    i once used an ipad where i had to be logged into apple cloud (?) to open a plain text file. duh.

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