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I want to find some very basic information on how to set up a file server that will serve a windows network. I understand that Samba is the program that ...
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    Where to Find File Server Basics (Windows PCs)


    I want to find some very basic information on how to set up a file server that will serve a windows network. I understand that Samba is the program that is used, but other than that, I no nothing. I'm currently running Mandrake 10.1, and understand that this can be used for it. Can someone send me a link to a site that explains things in a very basic way?

    Edit: I'll probably just reinstall the OS so that I start off fresh.

    Thanks!

    Scott

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    Super Moderator Roxoff's Avatar
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    Yes, samba is the tool to do this. For documentation, look here: http://us1.samba.org/samba/docs/man/...TO-Collection/
    Linux user #126863 - see http://linuxcounter.net/

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    Thanks. I found the SAMBA group site last night in my searches online. My problem is all the command line stuff in there. I've found that over the last six years of using Linux, it's the lack of command line knowledge that gets me burned out using the OS, and makes me quit using it for a while. Then I go back, use it for a few months, then get frustrated again, and drop it. Especially the process of installing new programs. It's so simple in a Windows based system, that I don't understand why all the steps that are involved in Linux.

    Thanks for the web link.

    Scott

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    Super Moderator Roxoff's Avatar
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    I dont know what update system Mandrake uses, but most of the modern distros use either yum or apt for thier updates (and on many you can configure it for the one you prefer). These are useful because they have graphical front-ends that are available, and these let you list available packages and point-click-install the binaries.
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    I'm running Mandriva (mandrake) which uses the MandrakeUpdate utility. I don't know what's going on in the background, but that's what they call it. The problem is that it isn't for adding new programs, only updating existing ones.

    It also uses a software management tool, I forget the name, to add/remove programs, but it only works to add programs on the original installation CDs that were used. So, it's not helpful at all when wanting to add something downloaded from the 'net.

    Scott

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    Super Moderator Roxoff's Avatar
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    Without the benefit of an update tool such as yum, life is more difficult. I use yum with yumex and kyum (depending on my mood...) with Fedora Core 4. I'm pretty sure you can configure Mandriva to use either yum or apt, perhaps googling would help here?

    Mandriva uses rpms I believe, so becoming familiar with 'rpm -Uvh ...' and 'rpm -ivh ...' might stand you in good stead too. Searching the internet for linux packages is pretty easy - and even missing dependencies can often be resolved quickly with the right search.

    If all else fails, dont forget you can still download and install from sources. If you need help with that, just ask away...
    Linux user #126863 - see http://linuxcounter.net/

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    Quote Originally Posted by chemikalguy
    It also uses a software management tool, I forget the name, to add/remove programs, but it only works to add programs on the original installation CDs that were used. So, it's not helpful at all when wanting to add something downloaded from the 'net.
    You can use Mandrake's software management tool to automatically download and install rpms from the internet. Its quite easy when it works. Its just not so easy to set-up.

    You just need to find rpm repositories.

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