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Timeout error occurred trying to start MySQL Daemon. Starting MySQL: [FAILED] i've tried almost everything I found on this forum. uninstall the mysql-server + rm -fr /var/lib/mysql + rm /etc/my.cnf ...
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  1. #1
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    Timeout error occurred trying to start MySQL Daemon


    Timeout error occurred trying to start MySQL Daemon.
    Starting MySQL: [FAILED]

    i've tried almost everything I found on this forum. uninstall the mysql-server + rm -fr /var/lib/mysql + rm /etc/my.cnf + reinstalling the mysql-server for starting with my.cnf clean, i read a lot of things from manny manny help forums but i still can't get this ass **** mysql to work. I am using the FC 4. don't know what to do (but kill myself )...
    Please give me a hand, or two if needed.

    i forgot to say that this is for local use. (maibe this will ease the problem...)

    10x,
    Herod.

  2. #2
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    anyone? help? Please...

  3. #3
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    Solution: mysqld service not launching

    When connecting to a MySQL server located on the local system, the mysql client connects thorugh a local file called a socket instead of connecting to the localhost loopback address 127.0.0.1. For the mysql client, the default location of this socket file is /tmp/mysql.sock. However, for a variety of reasons, many MySQL installations place this socket file somewhere else like /var/lib/mysql/mysql.sock.

    While it is possible to make this work by specifying the socket file directly in the mysql client command

    mysql --socket=/var/lib/mysql/mysql.sock ...

    it is painful to type this in every time. If you must do so this way (because you don’t have permissions to the file in the solution below), you could create an alias in your shell to make this work (like alias mysql=”mysql –socket=/var/lib/mysql/mysql.sock” depending on your shell).

    To make your life easier, you can make a simple change to the MySQL configuration file /etc/my.cnf that will permanently set the socket file used by the mysql client. After making a backup copy of /etc/my.cnf, open it in your favorite editor. The file is divided into sections such as

    [mysqld]
    datadir=/usr/local/mysql/data
    socket=/var/lib/mysql/mysql.sock

    [mysql.server]
    user=mysql
    basedir=/usr/local/mysql

    If there is not currently a section called [client], add one at the bottom of the file and copy the socket= line under the [mysqld] section such as:

    [client]
    socket=/var/lib/mysql/mysql.sock

    If there is already a [client] section in the my.cnf file, add or edit the socket line as appropriate. You won’t need to restart your server or any other processes. Subsequent uses of the mysql client will use the proper socket file.

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