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Today at work, our system administrator asked me if had any use for some "old computer stuff". We recently got new computers (with XP :banghead: ) and also a new ...
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  1. #1
    Just Joined! jaguardriver's Avatar
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    Copy problems across network (was: Sometimes you win . . .)


    Today at work, our system administrator asked me if had any use for some "old computer stuff". We recently got new computers (with XP :banghead: ) and also a new server was installed.

    So we went through the stuff and I picked out a 3com SuperStack hub (24 connections ) and our old server (sorry, no specs yet)...

    At the moment, I have a P2 333mhz pc running a file/printerserver.
    I did get my "old" workstation from work some weeks ago (P3 733mhz) which I was going to install as the new server at home.

    What should I do? Is an "official" server better to use than an "ordinary" pc? Pity I don't have any specs yet, but this "official" server is rackmounted and I saw several harddisks (mirrored?).

    My knowledge about company kind of servers is extreme limited, so any thoughts are very welcome!!
    I get the stuff for free, so I do go home happy

  2. #2
    flw
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    Depends.

    Most servers are not setup for mutlimedia type apps like gaming, sound etc.. So the graphics card will be lame for a gaming machine or sound card may not even exist.

    The "extra" drives are for some type of "RAID" system, usually type 1 or 5 and are for redundancy not speed, same for two controllers, power supplies, nics, etc....
    Dan

    \"Keep your friends close and your enemies even closer\" from The Art of War by Sun Tzu\"

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    Just Joined! jaguardriver's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by flw
    Most servers are not setup for mutlimedia type apps like gaming, sound etc.. So the graphics card will be lame for a gaming machine or sound card may not even exist.
    Should not be a problem, the current server at home is a box nicely tucked away somewhere (I'm still looking for it ).


    Quote Originally Posted by flw
    Depends.
    The "extra" drives are for some type of "RAID" system, usually type 1 or 5 and are for redundancy not speed, same for two controllers, power supplies, nics, etc....
    Hmmm, sounds scary...
    Sorry, you've lost me here...

  4. #4
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    Quote Originally Posted by jaguardriver
    Hmmm, sounds scary...
    Sorry, you've lost me here...
    RAID = Redundant Array of Independent Drives

    There's a good description of it here:
    http://www.redpathgroup.com/about_raid.html
    \"Everything should be made as simple as possible, but not simpler.\"
    Albert Einstein

  5. #5
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    ah, proper hardware

    Rackmount servers are cool, and are designed to be left on continously. Generally there hardware is much more geared to networking, and you will proberly find it has a really good network cards in.

    RAID, depending on how its configured basically provides redundancy, so for example, if one morning you wake up to discover one of the harddisks has totally died, you will proberly not loose a single bit of data. (though this is still no excuse not to backup your data )

    Forget about plugging a monitor into these things with the idea of playing games or using a GUI, the graphics (if it has a VGA monitor port), will be poor quality.

    Jason

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    Linux Guru sarumont's Avatar
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    So you're going to hook all of us up with some free stuff, too, right?
    "Time is an illusion. Lunchtime, doubly so."
    ~Douglas Adams, The Hitchhiker's Guide to the Galaxy

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    Just Joined! jaguardriver's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by sarumont
    So you're going to hook all of us up with some free stuff, too, right?
    Heh heh heh heh
    The hub has 24 conncections, so I'd say throw a utp cable!!


    Yesterday when I came home, I fired up the server and here are some specs.
    It's a Compaq Proliant ML350 (bios year 2000) with a P3 733mHz processor and 512 Mb. Two SCSI harddisks are included: one of 9,1 GB ultra 2 (C:\) and one of 18,2 GB ultra 3 (D:\ and E:\).

    It's obvious that I'm gonna get rid of Windows Small Business Server and install Linux on it

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    Just Joined! jaguardriver's Avatar
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    The new machine is installed as the server in my network.
    NFS and CUPS has been installed and is working.

    The network has been upgraded from 10mbps to 100mbps (had to install only one new networkcard ).

    But there something that's happening and I can't explain it..... HELP!!!!
    If I copy a huge moviefile (97,3mb) from any workstation to a (NFS) directory on the server, I get an "I/O error" after 20-50 mb has been copied... If I copy the same file straight from the cdrom-drive to the server, no problems....

    Any ideas what might cause this?

  9. #9
    flw
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    Is this via FTP, samba or copy/paste to another partition (fat32?) ? If cp, then are you doing it via cnd line or a GUI?

    Also the Distro and version would help along with the same for Samba etc...
    Dan

    \"Keep your friends close and your enemies even closer\" from The Art of War by Sun Tzu\"

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    Just Joined! jaguardriver's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by flw
    Is this via FTP, samba or copy/paste to another partition (fat32?) ? If cp, then are you doing it via cnd line or a GUI?

    Also the Distro and version would help along with the same for Samba etc...
    System layout (test situation):
    1 server (Fedora Core 1), 1 workstation (Fedora Core 1) and 1 workstation (Redhat 9). Network speed is 100mbps. Copying from IDE harddisk (workstation) to SCSI harddisk (server) results in "I/O error" (both workstations!). Copying from IDE cdrom (workstation) to SCSI harddisk (server) goes flawless (both workstations!). The actual copying is done in X (select file, "copy", select destination directory, "paste"), nothing done through commandline (sorry, I'm a former Windows-junky).

    Before I installed my new server and upgraded the network speed, the mentioned problem did never occur...

    System layout (before upgrading):
    1 server (Redhat 9), 1 workstation (Fedora Core 1) and 1 workstation (Redhat 9). Network speed was 10mbps.

    The sharing service used is NFS, no samba here!

    Hope this info is more helpful

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