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I created a [homes] section in my samba config. I created a user on the Linux system, as well as a password using smbpasswd. When I connect to the samba ...
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  1. #1
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    Samba share is readonly?


    I created a [homes] section in my samba config. I created a user on the Linux system, as well as a password using smbpasswd.

    When I connect to the samba share I am able to see the contents of the home directory, but am unable to modify or delete.

    I have not placed any file permissions values in the [global] section of the conf that should cause the connection to be readonly.

    Any quick hints as to my problem?

  2. #2
    flw
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    If you post your samba.conf we may be able to see the issue. Could be the order in which you located your resistrictions and the read only page.
    Dan

    \"Keep your friends close and your enemies even closer\" from The Art of War by Sun Tzu\"

  3. #3
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    would it be the permissions on the actual directory?
    the path that the mapped drive physically is on will need to have write permissions for that user i would assume.

    Jason

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    Change permissions

    If you set the user at a permission of 777 then it will work, I had the same problem earlier on, and this sorted it!

    Tyrone

  5. #5
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    write permissions,,,,,,

    If your home dir is for example /home/user/xxx , then set the permissions for dir xxx to 777.

    chmod 777 /home/user/xxx

    Regards,
    Tyrone Clark.

  6. #6
    Linux Guru sarumont's Avatar
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    I wouldn't necessarily chmod my home directory to 777, though. This would be a little safer:

    Code:
    chmod -R 755 /home/username
    "Time is an illusion. Lunchtime, doubly so."
    ~Douglas Adams, The Hitchhiker's Guide to the Galaxy

  7. #7
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    This was an EXAMPLE,,,,basically, the problem you are having is that the user that you logging in as on Samba when you perform you mapping is not allowed to write to the directory specified by samba as your home.
    If joe was the login name, and the dirs and files were owned by joe, you could use 755 [(user Read/Write/Execute) (group Read NoWrite Execute) (Others Read NoWrite Execute)], otherwise, back to 777 to allow 'Others' to write to the dir !!!!!!

    In short, you need to be the owner of the dir to be safe !

    Hope this makes this a little clearer.

  8. #8
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    Thanks guys. I was able to figure it out ... well, actually I stumbled all over it before the light bulb came on. Only took me 2 days to find it, too!

  9. #9
    Linux Guru sarumont's Avatar
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    Could you post the solution, so that we all may benefit from your discovery?
    "Time is an illusion. Lunchtime, doubly so."
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