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I'm setting up a web/mail server and when I type these at the command line, this is what I get: #dnsdomainname easydservers.com #domainname (none) #ypdomainname (none) #nisdomainname (none) The 3 ...
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  1. #1
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    domain names - is this normal?


    I'm setting up a web/mail server and when I type these at the command line, this is what I get:

    #dnsdomainname
    easydservers.com

    #domainname
    (none)

    #ypdomainname
    (none)

    #nisdomainname
    (none)

    The 3 'none' entries concern me a bit but also the dnsdomainname entry because easydservers.com is who i'm renting the server from but it's not the domain of the site I'm setting up. Can I just change it or will that cause problems?

    Thanks in advance,

    Alex =]

  2. #2
    Linux Engineer rcgreen's Avatar
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    You will have to set up a name server for your domain,
    or have someone else like the company that registered
    it do it for you. If you don't have a static ip address, you
    will also have to have to have it dynamically updated.

    http://www.dyndns.com/

  3. #3
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    thanks for the reply,

    I have a static IP address and I'm not sure if I need to set up a name server or not. At the moment the domain reg company has the domain pointing to my IP.

    Do you think I need to set up a name server or would I just be able to change these domain settings?

    (I'm sorry, as you may have realised, I'm new to this!)

    Alex =]

  4. #4
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    if your ip ever changes just forward the domain to the new ip...no need for dyndns etc
    Operating System: GNU Emacs

  5. #5
    Super Moderator Roxoff's Avatar
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    Take a look at the manpage for 'domainname' and the others - they're all on one page.

    dnsdomainname - shows the DNS domain name.
    domainname, ypdomainname, nisdomainname - all show the NIS/YP domainname.

    NIS/YP is an old, insecure service that serves passwords over the network for local authentication against a central password database. Normally you dont share this information over the internet, and its quite normal if you dont use NIS or YP for these to be completely blank.
    Linux user #126863 - see http://linuxcounter.net/

  6. #6
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    great. thanks for the advice!

    I'm slowly getting an understanding of all this although there's still quite a bit I need to figure out. i'm just reading up on:

    etc/hosts
    etc/host.conf
    etc/resolv.conf

    as well and think i probably need to configure these as well.

    Is changing the main hostname and domainname in the etc/hosts file likely to cause problems?

    Is it worth me configuring BIND9 or should I just leave all the DNS stuff to the people I registered the domain with?

    I just want a single domain to be locked into this IP and for all mail to be sent / received through whoever@thedomainname.co.uk

    Again, thanks for the help.

    Alex =]

  7. #7
    Linux Engineer rcgreen's Avatar
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    It's probably ok to let them handle it. If your domain
    resolves to your ip address that's the only important issue.
    Now, all you have to do is set up a mail server.
    Good luck!

  8. #8
    Super Moderator Roxoff's Avatar
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    Yeah, for your main domain, I'd let your ISP keep handling the DNS entries. If you're planning to hang a network of multiple machines behind that IP address, however, you may want to consider using a local dns server for the private address space behind your router/firewall, which is not visible from the internet.
    Linux user #126863 - see http://linuxcounter.net/

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