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Hi all, I have a pc that is lying redundant in my apartment. My housemate and i both use laptops (mac and pc) and are both linked to our ADSL ...
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  1. #1
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    Setting up a fileserver


    Hi all,

    I have a pc that is lying redundant in my apartment. My housemate and i both use laptops (mac and pc) and are both linked to our ADSL connection through a router.

    I am wondering can I set my old PC up as a file server? I have no idea of how to go about this so anyones adivce is much appreciated.

    I basically want to use it to store music and video files to play back via itunes etc with our laptops. I presume linux will be more reliable than windows for running a server.

    Look forward to hearing your advice.

    Thanks,

    Rob

  2. #2
    Linux Guru antidrugue's Avatar
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    There are ways to do that.

    If the machine is rather old, then you only want to install a minimalist distro, with only Samba (file sharing program compatible with Windows/MAC) on it.

    You can choose whichever distro you like.

    For example, you can pick Debian. Install only the "base" package during installation procedure (not the "desktop" one, as you don't need the X server). Once it is done, you can even unplug the monitor and the keyboard (given you specifyed in the BIOS that it is ok to boot without a keyboard -- "halt on all errors, except keyboard").

    Once the base system, is in place, install Samba :
    Code:
    apt-get install samba
    And configure /etc/samba/smb.conf the way you like it.

    A few pointers here :
    http://ubuntuguide.org/wiki/Dapper#Samba_Server

    Of course there are easier ways to do that, but those will include puting the burden of a graphical interface on a system that doesn't need it.
    "To express yourself in freedom, you must die to everything of yesterday. From the 'old', you derive security; from the 'new', you gain the flow."

    -Bruce Lee

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    i must let you know i am complete linux novice!!

    rob

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  5. #4
    Linux Guru antidrugue's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by rgbell
    i must let you know i am complete linux novice!!
    As I mentionned, there are easier solution.

    There is a complete tutorial here :
    http://www.howtoforge.com/samba_setup_ubuntu_5.10

    Which you can apply to either Ubuntu 6.06.1 (latest stable Ubuntu version) or to Debian 3.1r3 (latest stable one as well). Don't let the apparent complexity of this tutorial frighten you : you can do it, just take your time, and follow all the steps (except perhaps quota mangement, which is not required).

    Ubuntu download :
    ubuntu-6.06.1-server-i386.iso

    Debian download :
    debian-31r3-i386-netinst.iso

    There a of courses dozens if not hundreds of alternative ways to do that. Other people may suggest other solutions.
    "To express yourself in freedom, you must die to everything of yesterday. From the 'old', you derive security; from the 'new', you gain the flow."

    -Bruce Lee

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    That tutorial seems fine! How do I make my pc or mac see the server?

    Rob

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    After setting up Samba you can effectively connect to it as if it was a Windows share.

    From your Mac :
    http://docs.info.apple.com/article.html?artnum=106471

    From your PC :
    http://support.microsoft.com/kb/300856
    "To express yourself in freedom, you must die to everything of yesterday. From the 'old', you derive security; from the 'new', you gain the flow."

    -Bruce Lee

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    I am at the command line but it won't seem to do anything! Have it installed but can't get past the set the root user bit!

    Any ideas?

  9. #8
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    Quote Originally Posted by rgbell
    I am at the command line but it won't seem to do anything! Have it installed but can't get past the set the root user bit!
    Which distro are you installing ? Debian ? Ubuntu ?

    What do you mean exactly ? I'm not sure I understand your issue. Can you give more details ?
    "To express yourself in freedom, you must die to everything of yesterday. From the 'old', you derive security; from the 'new', you gain the flow."

    -Bruce Lee

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    I am running ubuntu

    logged on and not sure wat to do now

  11. #10
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    Ubuntu doesn't use the root account by default. You can just use the "sudo" command instead. When ask for the password, type it and hit ENTER (the password won't appear as you type it).

    The next step for you should be to install "samba" :

    First update your local repositories :
    Code:
    sudo apt-get update
    Then install it :
    Code:
    sudo apt-get install samba
    Then configure samba as explained here :
    http://ubuntuguide.org/wiki/Dapper#Samba_Server
    "To express yourself in freedom, you must die to everything of yesterday. From the 'old', you derive security; from the 'new', you gain the flow."

    -Bruce Lee

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