Find the answer to your Linux question:
Page 1 of 2 1 2 LastLast
Results 1 to 10 of 20
Hello, I just installed Apache 1.3.26. I'm using debian and it seems to have set up most of the configuration. A few questions lingering in my head. One, I'm using ...
Enjoy an ad free experience by logging in. Not a member yet? Register.
  1. #1
    Linux Engineer
    Join Date
    Nov 2002
    Location
    Queens, NY
    Posts
    1,319

    Apache newbie


    Hello,

    I just installed Apache 1.3.26. I'm using debian and it seems to have set up most of the configuration.
    A few questions lingering in my head. One, I'm using ServerType standalone. When I boot my machine, this is started as a daemon. How can I stop this from starting at boot time? I'm not using apache to serve files but rather learn how to use it. It would be a discomfort for it to start everytime I booted.
    Second, as far as I understand, the ServerRoot is set to /var/www. When I try and view my home page, 127.0.0.1, the index.html file is loaded which indicats that apache is running. In this page, there is a link to 127.0.0.1/docs/apache. Would this directory be equivalent to /var/www/docs/apache? If so, I don't have such a directory and I couldn't even understand why they would put that.
    Third, in my document directory for apache manuals, there are files that end in .html.html. Is this normal or is this a bug?
    The best things in life are free.

  2. #2
    Linux Guru
    Join Date
    Oct 2001
    Location
    Täby, Sweden
    Posts
    7,578
    You can stop apache from loading at boot time by editing your boot scripts. Since I don't know your distro, I don't know how your boot scripts work, but if you're using a SysV compatible setup, try to remove /etc/rc.d/rc?.d/S??httpd.
    Does the link to /docs/apache work? If it doesn't, there you have the answer. If it does, it could be a virtual directory setup. You can set up virtual directories in your apache config, eg. to make /docs point to /usr/share/doc/apache. /cgi-bin, for example, is most often implemented in that way.
    The .html.html doesn't seem normal to me, but I dunno.

  3. #3
    Linux Engineer
    Join Date
    Nov 2002
    Location
    Queens, NY
    Posts
    1,319

    Dolda to the rescue

    Dolda,

    Is there anything you don't know? I think you answer well over 90% of my questions in any topic in this forum. =)
    Anyhow, I'm using debian and after reading the apache docs, it seems that i need to edit /etc/rc.local or rc.<whatever>. Since I'm using debian, I don't have the corresponding files that they mentioned so I went inside the /etc directory and did a find command that would match 'apache'
    Code:
    &#91;root@parker etc&#93;# find . -name "*apache*" -print
    ./init.d/apache
    ./rc0.d/K20apache
    ./rc1.d/K20apache
    ./rc2.d/S91apache
    ./rc3.d/S91apache
    ./rc4.d/S91apache
    ./rc5.d/S91apache
    ./rc6.d/K20apache
    ./logrotate.d/apache
    ./apache
    I suppose I need to ask a debian user how to mess with these files but for now, I'll just leave it as is.
    As for the problem with /docs/apache, it is a link and when I drag the mouse over it, the dialog in the webrowser displays 127.0.0.1/docs/apache. Now I installed this last night around 4AM so my memory is kinda distorted(since I was half awake) but I remember when I clicked on this link, the apache document loaded. However, today I am getting an error stating that I don't have permission to access that page. Furthermore, I already mentioned the .html.html files within that directory. Something very odd is happening here and I wish I knew what the heck was going on. I'm coming to the conclusion that debian maybe susceptible to faults. Still, I'll keep it since it's still the most stable system I've used.
    The best things in life are free.

  4. #4
    Linux Guru
    Join Date
    Oct 2001
    Location
    Täby, Sweden
    Posts
    7,578
    Oh, how I love when you say things like that. Please go on! =)
    Really, I don't _know_ the answer to even half the questions here, I just look them up as they keep rolling in. You have no idea how much I've learned here. If I could get a job like this, I'd probably stay there for life.

    Anyway, Debian seems to be SysV compatible (I'd be surprised otherwise), so to stop apache from starting at boot, run this:
    Code:
    for file in /etc/rc?.d/S??apache; do mv $file $&#123;file%/*&#125;/K20$&#123;file##*/S??&#125;; done
    Then run "service apache start" to start it at will.

    About that your don't have permissions to load /docs/apache, haven't you just done something, like editiing your config or removed index.html or something? I don't think that it's the filesystem that's failing, unless you have some hardware failure. In that case you'd be looking at far more serious errors than this, though.

  5. #5
    Linux Engineer
    Join Date
    Nov 2002
    Location
    Queens, NY
    Posts
    1,319

    ...

    Dolda,

    What is SysV? I guess the shell script would work. I'll take a more thorough look at it once I boot back into linux.
    Well, I haven't done anything with editing or removing my config file. What made you get that idea? I took a look at the index.html file inside /var/www which is the ServerRoot. Here is what that link looks like
    Code:
    apache doc
    I'm assuming that this points to /usr/share/doc/apache which has all the correct permissions but for some reason, apache won't let me view them.
    The best things in life are free.

  6. #6
    Linux Enthusiast
    Join Date
    Jun 2002
    Location
    San Antonio
    Posts
    621
    SysV is a startup script paradigm. It is just a series of programs that run through the /etc/init.d/rc?.d/ directories for each runlevel and starting/stopping programs as needed. There are a couple competing methods (I don't know their names offhand) but I could see where they would be better. For instance, booting hangs on certain things (negotiating network config) that might not be needed for other programs. For example, if your network is unplugged and you are using DHCP it will sit for like 30 seconds, instead of effectively using that 30 seconds to start other processes that do not need the network to be up (cron, syslog, gpm, etc.). I can see the day when something takes it over because it supports multithreading so instead of going (excuse the ascii art):
    Code:
    | 1
    | 2
    | 3
    | 4
    | 5
    | 6
    | 7
    | 8
    | 9
    | 10
    | 11
    it might be able to go:
    Code:
              | 1
          2  / \ 3
         4  / \ 5 \ 6
    you know?
    I respectfully decline the invitation to join your delusion.

  7. #7
    Linux Guru
    Join Date
    Oct 2001
    Location
    Täby, Sweden
    Posts
    7,578
    That would be really good. Thanks for the idea, wassy; now I have a new small project.

  8. #8
    Linux Engineer
    Join Date
    Nov 2002
    Location
    Queens, NY
    Posts
    1,319

    /doc/apache

    Any ideas about /doc/apache and why I get that permission error?
    The best things in life are free.

  9. #9
    Linux Enthusiast
    Join Date
    Jun 2002
    Location
    San Antonio
    Posts
    621
    Dolda: if it gets bigger than you thought, and takes over 54 days to complete I would love to work on it with you (after graduation). I also have all the development goodies installed on my computer like cvs server and bugzilla. Not that you wouldn't know how to do it
    I respectfully decline the invitation to join your delusion.

  10. #10
    Linux Guru
    Join Date
    Oct 2001
    Location
    Täby, Sweden
    Posts
    7,578
    bpark: Can you check the access_log and error_log for hints?

    wassy: That would be nice, in deed. I would like to learn how to develop cooperatively, too. This far I've done all my projects alone.

Page 1 of 2 1 2 LastLast

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •