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  1. #11
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    here's what it says


    root@codefuror:~# cat /etc/fstab
    /dev/hda3 swap swap defaults 0 0
    /dev/hda2 / ext3 defaults 1 1
    /dev/hda1 /Windows ntfs ro 1 0
    #/dev/cdrom /mnt/cdrom auto noauto,owner,ro 0 0
    /dev/fd0 /mnt/floppy auto noauto,owner 0 0
    devpts /dev/pts devpts gid=5,mode=620 0 0
    proc /proc proc defaults 0 0
    root@codefuror:~# fdisk -l

    +++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++
    I notice that /dev/hda2 has no name, I know I named it Linux during install. As for the first code this is what I get.

    root@codefuror:~# id
    uid=0(root) gid=0(root) groups=0(root),1(bin),2(daemon),3(sys),4(adm),6(di sk),10(wheel),11(floppy)
    root@codefuror:~# useradd -G plugdev root
    useradd: user root exists

    Just makes no since man.

  2. #12
    Super Moderator devils casper's Avatar
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    Open /etc/fstab file
    [code]
    su -
    nano /etc/fstab
    [code]
    Replace this line
    Code:
    /dev/hda1              /Windows          ntfs     ro    1   0
    with this
    Code:
    /dev/hda1              /Windows          ntfs    defaults,umask=0 0 0
    root@codefuror:~# useradd -G plugdev root
    useradd: user root exists
    Execute this
    Code:
    su -
    usermod -a -G plugdev root
    It is amazing what you can accomplish if you do not care who gets the credit.
    New Users: Read This First

  3. #13
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    I Found A Way!

    This has been a lame discovery in Slackware 12 to say the least. In Slackware 11 the Linux partition is available for any type of modifications to the "root" user. Permission denied to the person that set the operating system up in the first place is just stupid. I would like to thank everybody that helped me with this problem. Its a shame that such a great operating system has to be such a pain because of security features.

    I have found a way to access the Linux partition and be able to modify the files it contains even though I still cant mount the Linux drive as any user and all methods have failed. "retarded" here's how I accessed the actual fstab file while still not being able to mount the Linux /dev/hda2 partition.

    Kmenu, Find Files/Folders in the look in: drop down menu is the entire Linux partition folders. I simply typed in the named: box fstab and in the Look in: drop down menu I selected file:///etc clicked find and there it was, the fstab file I dont have permission too in my unmounted Linux /dev/hda2 partition.

    Now how stupid is that?

    I used this same method to create a usbflash folder on my desktop, then I right clicked on it, went to copy to and chose root folder, mnt and copied it to that directory then edited my fstab file accordingly:

    /dev/sda1 /mnt/usbflash vfat noauto,users,exec,rw 0 0

    Now my flash drive mounts when I click it. Sweet. So I guess there's more than one way to skin a cat, lol. I'll just use this method when I need to access a file on the Linux partition

    Thanks again to everyone that spent time answering this post.

    codefuror

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  5. #14
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    I forgot to tell you. If you are trying to mount a usb flash drive or the like, you'll want to do this first, Open a terminal and type:

    su -

    then type:

    fdisk -l

    This will tell you the exact boot name of your device. Mine in the prior post was /dev/sda1 yours may be different.

    Peace, Codefuror

  6. #15
    Super Moderator devils casper's Avatar
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    I am not using Slackware now and some of the reasons you have mentioned already.
    Well ! I am glad that you have sorted out problem.
    It is amazing what you can accomplish if you do not care who gets the credit.
    New Users: Read This First

  7. #16
    forum.guy
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    Quote Originally Posted by CODEFUROR View Post
    So I guess there's more than one way to skin a cat, lol.
    Yep, that's right... there are usually at least two ways to do anything in Linux, and quite often a number of different ways.

    Have fun with Linux...
    oz

  8. #17
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    Unmounted hard drive. Complete Fix!

    Through trial and error I have came up with a permanent fix to this problem. Let me refresh your memory on what that was first. After installing Slackware 12 I had absolutely no access to my Linux partition (it was unmounted) every time I tried to mount it I would get an error that essentially said "I didn't have permission" So not being able to access the drive, how could I edit fstab?

    Well there are a few ways of doing this but I'm only going to tell you the fastest way I know to permanently have access. Here's what I did and it should work for you as well. Open your "Home" folder, on the left hand side of the windows you will see a listing of various icons. Click the RED "root folder" this will open a listing of all the folders on your Linux partition.

    Click on the "mnt" folder NOT the plus/expand sign next to it. This will show you a window with all the folders inside the mnt folder. Now on the task bar at the top of the window, click edit, create new, folder.

    Naming the folder:

    In my case I'm running a dualboot Windows XP, Slackware 12.0 system, so my Linux partition is on hda2 and Windows is on hda1 If you are unsure of which one yours is on, do the following:

    Open a terminal and type: fdisk -l
    Thats fdisk with a space a dash and a lower case L
    Press enter, this will give you a listing of all of your drives. They will be something like: /dev/hda1 /dev/hda2 /dev/hda3 etc. depending on your setup.

    Now name that folder you created in "mnt" in my case was hda2

    Now click on the "etc" folder same as above so it gives you a listing of all files and folders within the "etc" directory. Scroll down until you see the "fstab" file, it has a little pencil image on it. Open this file, Under the last line add the following:

    /dev/hda2 /mnt/hda2 reiserfs noauto,users,exec,rw 0 0

    of course replacing /mnt/hda2 and your file system, mine is reiserfs if yours is different change accordingly, example: /mnt/hda1 ext3. Now I know some of you are saying "I already have a /dev/hda2 or similar listing in my fstab".

    This is the way mine is listed in my fstab:

    /dev/hda2 / reiserfs defaults 1 1

    As you can see their is no mount point. From what I've read Slackware 12 is unmounted by default. Maybe for security reasons, I don't know. What I do know is that it was driving me nuts not being able to directly access the drive.

    Either way, !!! DO NOT EDIT OR MODIFY THAT LINE !!! Your system will not boot if you mess with it. And trying the pico /etc/fstab method from command line WILL NOT WORK after you reboot because you don't have permissions. So leave it alone and add the line I told you to the bottom of your fstab and you'll be in there.

    Trust me it works!

    After you edit and save fstab your unmounted drive will be accessible immediately. And it doesn't cause any conflicts. But as we all know, do this at your own risk!

    Now I'm sure to a more experienced Linux user than I, this sounds stupid. But hey man I'm new and learning and this worked for me Although the real truth of the matter is... If you can access another way, why mess with it? I just don't like to lose, LOL

    Enjoy
    Codefuror

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