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Originally Posted by pfeigl The drive is shown, but it says it is empty and looks empty when you click on it. What's a drive?? To avoid confusion: 'drive' is ...
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  1. #41
    Linux Engineer Freston's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by pfeigl
    The drive is shown, but it says it is empty and looks empty when you click on it.
    What's a drive??

    To avoid confusion: 'drive' is a Windows term. Please don't use it in a Linux context. We don't have 'drives'.
    In Linux, we have a devices, filesystems and mountpoints.

    This appears more complex, once you get used to it you'll find it's very transparent and offers greater flexibility.

    Example:
    Your HDD is a device. It's called /dev/sda.
    Because it's partitioned, the kernel counts the partitions. Your first partition is called /dev/sda1
    On /dev/sda1 you have created (through the installer) an ext3 filesystem.
    Your ext3 filesystem on /dev/sda1 is mounted under /
    When you type > ls / < you see the filesystem mounted under / and therefor you see the contends of your first partition on your HDD.

    /mnt/hd is just an empty directory that may or may not function as a mountpoint, at your discretion. It is not a drive. It serves no purpose, it holds no data, it is just an empty directory serving as a potential mountpoint.


    ---

    Now again, what is it you are trying to do? Becasue as I read it, you want to mount /dev/sda1 under /mnt/hd?? But /dev/sda1 is already mounted under /

    Now it could be that I read you wrong. I apologize in advance. But could you then please clarify what you intend?
    Because I've also noticed you don't have a filesystem created on /dev/sda2... but I don't want to add to any potential confusion
    Can't tell an OS by it's GUI

  2. #42
    Linux Guru Jonathan183's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Freston View Post
    Because I've also noticed you don't have a filesystem created on /dev/sda2... but I don't want to add to any potential confusion
    sda2 is an extended partition which contains the swap partition sda5.

  3. #43
    Linux Engineer Freston's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Jonathan183
    sda2 is an extended partition which contains the swap partition sda5.
    You are very much right:
    Device Boot Start End Blocks Id System
    /dev/sda1 * 1 30073 241561341 83 Linux
    /dev/sda2 30074 30401 2634660 5 Extended
    /dev/sda5 30074 30401 2634628+ 82 Linux swap

    I didn't check. Sorry. Don't mind me. Carry on
    Can't tell an OS by it's GUI

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  5. #44
    Linux Guru Jonathan183's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Freston View Post
    You are very much right:
    Device Boot Start End Blocks Id System
    /dev/sda1 * 1 30073 241561341 83 Linux
    /dev/sda2 30074 30401 2634660 5 Extended
    /dev/sda5 30074 30401 2634628+ 82 Linux swap

    I didn't check. Sorry. Don't mind me. Carry on
    No problem Freston ... I just wanted to make sure in the mix up that the home folder ownership had not been trashed and then I was going to take a similar sort of line in terms of mount points and data expected to see as a regular user etc if needed hopefully the ownership will sort the issue.

  6. #45
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    Exclamation More data:

    Here is the listing. I believe it's OK.

    Code:
    root@SlackBox:/home# chown -R pfeigl pfeigl
    root@SlackBox:/home# ls -l
    total 8
    drwxr-xr-x  2 root   root  4096 2006-08-06 21:50 ftp/
    drwx--x--x 13 pfeigl users 4096 2008-04-01 15:21 pfeigl/
    root@SlackBox:/home#
    Peter

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    Post Clarification

    OK. To clarify, I want to view the filesystem in the GUI. When I click on the disk drive icon under system, I want to see a folder called "/" when I click on that I want to see everthing below / and so on.

    Is make sense?

  8. #47
    Linux Guru Jonathan183's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by pfeigl View Post
    Here is the listing. I believe it's OK.

    Code:
    root@SlackBox:/home# chown -R pfeigl pfeigl
    root@SlackBox:/home# ls -l
    total 8
    drwxr-xr-x  2 root   root  4096 2006-08-06 21:50 ftp/
    drwx--x--x 13 pfeigl users 4096 2008-04-01 15:21 pfeigl/
    root@SlackBox:/home#
    Peter
    It's close enough, as user pfeigl you should be able to see your home area in terminal and GUI. If its a fresh install you wont see much by default in there except the Desktop ... there are hidden folders (start with a .) which you should have an option to see in your file browser (something like view hidden files).

    Quote Originally Posted by pfeigl View Post
    OK. To clarify, I want to view the filesystem in the GUI. When I click on the disk drive icon under system, I want to see a folder called "/" when I click on that I want to see everthing below / and so on.

    Is make sense?
    You will be able to see information in your home area. Most of the system files are hidden from a normal user. You can list the information if you have root access rights, but I'd be careful about using root its easy to break things!

    You could change the file permissions for everything to allow you to read as a normal user ... but its probably not a good idea to do this.

    Why do you want to view the entire system? which GUI are you using?

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    Post More info

    I just want a GUI view of the filesystem to make things easier on occasion. It looks like what I'm after is sysfs. It's not in fstab, but it is mounted.

    Peter

  10. #49
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    I am using KDE on this box and Gnome on my Debian box.

    Peter

  11. #50
    Linux Guru Jonathan183's Avatar
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    I think what you are probably after is gksu or kdesu. Be careful - these allow you to run applications with root access rights. If you need a GUI for system admin ... I would limit this to file browse and simple text editor functions only. Other admin tools provided as part of the distro will usually gain root rights when needed.

    Hope this helps ... and there is probably already an option in existing menus for SuperUser file browsing etc so you may not need to use kdesu or gksu.

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