Find the answer to your Linux question:
Page 1 of 2 1 2 LastLast
Results 1 to 10 of 13
Hey all, long time no see. I have been busy with a lot of stuff.. But I am back here now for a while since I this is just the ...
Enjoy an ad free experience by logging in. Not a member yet? Register.
  1. #1
    Linux Engineer RobinVossen's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2007
    Location
    The Netherlands
    Posts
    1,429

    Best Package Management system for Slackware? ( And me? )


    Hey all, long time no see.
    I have been busy with a lot of stuff.. But I am back here now for a while since I this is just the best Linux forum around..

    I am down with a Question now.
    I am planning of buying a EEE PC. And I want to Customize it ( Of course )
    and I want to get rid of whatever is on it at the moment and turn it in a real me PC. ( Openbox / GNU Screen )
    And here is my problem. I wanted to put Gentoo on it. Well Was planning to. But then I thought, If I quickly need a new program I'd be sc*ewed since the Compiling on such a PC would take WAY to long.. So, what I thought of then was Debian. But since you are kind stuck with Debian aswell. Since you cant pick the Compiler Flags I got kind annoyed by it..
    So, well what to do now, and then I thought of Slackware.. Well Slackware was a good idea.. But, it doesn't have a Package manager.
    But then a friend of mine said there was a Package manager for Slackware that could Compile a Package or Install A BILIARY version of it. And it had package Resolution. So it also downloads all that I need to install it. Or at least tells me it. But then there was a Bummer.. he forgot the name.. So who can help me?

    Thanks,
    Cheers.
    Robin
    New Users, please read this..
    Google first, then ask..

  2. #2
    Linux User nalg0rath's Avatar
    Join Date
    Sep 2004
    Location
    Stockholm
    Posts
    303

  3. #3
    Linux Engineer RobinVossen's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2007
    Location
    The Netherlands
    Posts
    1,429
    Looks Pretty Solid. Is there a way to easily add packages to it?
    Since then I can compile some programs with my own flags. Add it to the slackpkg and then install it.
    New Users, please read this..
    Google first, then ask..

  4. #4
    oz
    oz is offline
    forum.guy
    Join Date
    May 2004
    Location
    arch linux
    Posts
    18,733
    I think slackpkg, swaret, and slapt-get are your primary options, unless something else has come out recently.
    oz

  5. #5
    Linux Engineer
    Join Date
    Jul 2003
    Location
    Farnborough, UK
    Posts
    1,305
    A number of years ago when I last used Slack there was a package manager called emerde. Was meant to give similar functionality as Gentoo's portage system.

    Not sure if it's still around though.
    Lansbury's Lido

    thekiadriver on #linuxforums - fleetingly

  6. #6
    Linux Engineer Freston's Avatar
    Join Date
    Mar 2007
    Location
    The Netherlands
    Posts
    1,049
    Quote Originally Posted by "RobinVossen
    But, it doesn't have a Package manager.
    Oh! Not true!

    It has a package manager, and a good one at that. It doesn't do dependency checking, so you have to think yourself. I have varying degree of success on that, but at least I know who to blame....
    If I may give a piece of personalized advice --meaning this is not the advice I'd give everyone, but seeing as how you like compiling, command line, and the ease of the TUI I think you'll love this package manager-- you compile like this:
    Code:
    ./configure && make && makepkg -flags packagename.tgz&& installpkg packagename.tgz.
    i take it you understand all usual flags apply. So compile your package as you would on any system, adding the flags you want. Just never 'make install', but replace this with the 'makepkg' and 'installpkg' combo. It's gold. Why? You want to remove the package? removepkg! That's all there is to it. Want to try out a different compile of the same package?? Just add version numbers.

    Safe all your active compiled packages in a special directory. /home/tgz/active/ or something like that. Now back that dir up as you do with every data dir. Want to reinstall? Move the packages from backup to the fresh system. And in one go, type:
    Code:
    installpkg /home/tgz/active/*tgz
    All your home brew packages that you compiled just the way you want them are back in place.
    Done


    The one that downloads and checks dependencies is slapt-get.
    There are also slackbuilds, which are essentially installers that you can add to uncompressed source and run the slackbuild instead of the regular compile steps.
    And you can use cruxports. But I've never done that. It is suposed to be very good though.
    Can't tell an OS by it's GUI

  7. #7
    Trusted Penguin Dapper Dan's Avatar
    Join Date
    Oct 2004
    Location
    The Sovereign State of South Carolina
    Posts
    4,628
    Quote Originally Posted by Freston View Post
    And you can use cruxports. But I've never done that. It is suposed to be very good though.
    CruxPorts4Slack is what steered me toward using straight out Crux from Slackware, which I still run on some boxes and still love. CruxPorts4Slack is not a good way to keep your total Slackware install up to date, but is great for installing new packages from source like OpenOffice, Audacity, VirtualBox and Compiz-Fusion just to name a few of the more than 3880 ports available. It also does dependency checking.

    I'm really starting to believe I'm the only person on the planet who is satisfied with the EEE PC's stock Xandros based interface. Lol...
    Linux Mint + IceWM Registered:#371367 New Members: click here

  8. #8
    Linux Engineer RobinVossen's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2007
    Location
    The Netherlands
    Posts
    1,429
    @ozar slackpkg looks pretty solid like I said before. And slapt-get looks nice aswell.. Ill look into both..
    @ChrisH It is still around, I also knew about it. But I heard ( never tried ) that it was buggy and dieing. Thats why I was looking for something else
    @Freston Heh, ok you are right.
    I think Id write a Bash Script for the compiling indeed. And put it in /usr/sbin/ to my root can run that.
    And I hope I can put in somekind of dep checking in the script since then I could do something like:
    Code:
    if $1 == b goto binairyinstall else goto srcinstall
    binairyInstall:
    do_slackpkg
    srcinstall:
    Do_Dep_Check
    foreach package
    {
      ./configure && make && makepkg -flags packagename.tgz&& installpk
      mv packagename.tgz /usr/installed/
    }
    @DapperDan
    Id look into that aswell, the reason why I want a Diffrent system then the Default EEE is that I want to use it for Developing and for my work. And that means a LOT of testing. And since the EEE isnt the fastes PC around I thought better run GNU Screen as Interfase so I wont waste RAM/CPU. ^^


    @ All,
    Thanks all I have somestuff to look into now. I think Ill get VMware out and start playing with Slackware ^^
    New Users, please read this..
    Google first, then ask..

  9. #9
    Trusted Penguin Dapper Dan's Avatar
    Join Date
    Oct 2004
    Location
    The Sovereign State of South Carolina
    Posts
    4,628
    Quote Originally Posted by RobinVossen View Post
    @DapperDan
    Id look into that aswell, the reason why I want a Diffrent system then the Default EEE is that I want to use it for Developing and for my work. And that means a LOT of testing. And since the EEE isnt the fastes PC around I thought better run GNU Screen as Interfase so I wont waste RAM/CPU. ^^
    Hi RobinVossen!

    After having used an EEE PC for seven months, it is my impression that it has limitations to the many demands buyers seem to be expecting of them.

    As you know, the keyboard and screen are very small. Perfect in my mind for light duty tasks like Internet surfing, checking Email, listening to songs and what not. My experience has been that it gets fairly tedious when trying to do heavier tasks that require a lot of typing. As you mentioned, it also has limitations in RAM and CPU.

    I know conventional laptops cost a little more, but with their larger keyboard and screen, not to mention wider choices of RAM and CPU, one might afford you a more accommodating platform from which to do more serious work like development and testing.

    It would never be my intention to be critical of you or your decisions so I hope you will take this in the friendly spirit it is given. In the end, only you know what is best for you, and I'm sure you'll make the right choice or already have. Good luck!
    Linux Mint + IceWM Registered:#371367 New Members: click here

  10. #10
    Linux Engineer RobinVossen's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2007
    Location
    The Netherlands
    Posts
    1,429
    I see what you are saying. Well I will most of the time be doing small tests. Since the big tests will be done on a MainFrame..
    The Reason why I want a EEE is since I want a Small Laptop ( Max 10" )
    And since I can't find any laptops in that way I have been looking for a Phone / PDA that could do that.
    And then I saw the EEE. And It looked just what I wanted for a thing.
    Since I Fly a lot, and I don't like to take a Bag in the Plane. I want something that I can just put in my Jacked. Answer EEE.
    I know its a 'Old-Timer' box. And only meant for Music and Simple Emailing.
    But, that doesn't mean I can't use it to Analyse Sniffing snipers. or programming.
    I know compiling will take a long time. And such.
    But thanks for warning me I am going to try the EEE before I buy.

    Cheers,
    Robin
    New Users, please read this..
    Google first, then ask..

Page 1 of 2 1 2 LastLast

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •